Seasons Archives: Fall 2017

Vistas & Vignettes: Paper, Pencils & Pastels

Julia McCrayPencils & Pastels
Nancy YerginPaper collage

Making Beautiful Things Inspires Tionesta Artists & Community Leaders

The desire to make beautiful things is innate, as children remind us with their bold and vivid depictions of the world around them. The American caricaturist Al Hirschfeld said that artists are just children who refuse to put down their crayons. For only a handful of us, however, does that creative urge survive beyond childhood. Creativity doesn’t wait for you to go shopping or brush your teeth or write a report; it’s an immediate sort of thing, which – once pressing itself upon you – needs to be set free. With the demands of a career and raising a family, exploring one’s creativity and making art are often put on the back burner or viewed as a luxurious indulgence.

Fortunately for us, many long-time and recent residents have returned to their youthful love of art or discovered the joy of creating beautiful things in retirement or after the nest is empty. Inspired by the beauty of the Allegheny River Valley Region, making art has become a necessity of life for them and sharing that with others, a mission. The Red Brick Gallery’s Artistic Director, botanical artist Donna Edmonds, moved to Parker, returned to her love of painting and created the Foxburg artist cooperative after retiring from a corporate career.

Two similarly dedicated artists and cultural leaders from Tionesta – Julia McCray and Nancy Yergin – are presented in the The Red Brick Gallery’s Exhibit, “Vistas and Vignettes: Paper, Pencils and Pastels”,  from Friday, August 25 to Sunday, October 1 at 17 Main Street, Foxburg. Meet the Artists in a reception at the Gallery on Sunday, October 1, from 4 to 6:00 PM after the chamber music concert, “Debussy and Schubert on the Allegheny” featuring members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and ARCA’s favorite program host, Pianist David Allen Wehr.


Julia McCray is known for soft realism, depth, and detail that draw you into her pastel landscape and colored pencil still life paintings. Her inspiration is the natural landscape where she lives, the flowers from her garden, vegetables from the farmer’s market, and time-worn household items. Paper collage is Nancy Yergin’s preferred medium. Using a combination of cut and torn tissue, opaque and hand-crafted Asian papers on stretched canvases, her colorful works are held together with acrylic medium, built layer by layer, and then finished off with pen and ink.

Through the Trees-Cook Forest – Julia McCray

McCray and Yergin also are co-founders of the Forest Area Arts Council, and the “From the Forest Gallery”. According to McCray, “Nancy Yergin and I co-founded the Forest Area Arts Council in 2001 because we saw a lot of local talent that was going un-recognized. We wanted to help promote the artists, draw more of them out of their “closets”, and encourage them to think of themselves as artists. Nancy and I also wanted to provide access to affordable art experiences and education opportunities for everyone in Forest County. FAAC has sponsored events, performances, workshops, residencies, field trips, and many other arts activities that otherwise would not have been available.”

Their efforts also have had an economic impact on their community. Mc Cray continues, “Tionesta is becoming a creative community – the basis for its recent economic growth – which probably wouldn’t have occurred without formation of the arts council and its art gallery.  The creation of the gallery was prompted – in part – by the fact Forest County had almost no participating artists/sites on the PA Wilds Artisan Trail.  The gallery was also a way to give visitors access to local artists.”

Their vision and generous contribution to the cultural life of their community is rooted in their personal journey as artists. Nancy Yergin, a retired cooperative extension agent, had had no formal fine-arts background. She learned the basics of collage in a small workshop in 2004 and has continued to develop her own style and application.

Nancy Yergin, paper collage

Yergin says, “When I arrived in Forest County in 1995, I had no sense of myself as an artist – I was a registered dietitian; a county agent for Penn State Cooperative Extension; and a resource in a five-county region on topics that didn’t include art. By my second year on the job, I discovered that I was good at teaching people to learn and utilize concepts to improve their lives. Perhaps now I could improve my own.

What I really wanted to do was to make beautiful things. I already knew I was creative enough to knit, to build a flower/vegetable garden, and raise a child to adulthood. I admired fine art in galleries but couldn’t afford to buy it. I wanted to make my own art. I needed art education. In Forest County, art instruction was available to public school students but not adults. In 1999 Julia McCray and I put our heads together and began working on an idea to build some sort of organization that would bring the Arts to a rural community.”

Carve out a moment in your busy lives to plan a trip to Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Art’s Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop in Foxburg to see their beautiful work – perhaps as a touchstone to your own artistic urges just waiting to be expressed or as a reminder of the importance of supporting the cultural life of our beautiful Allegheny River Valley. Gallery Hours are Fridays 1:00 – 5:00 PM, Saturdays 11:00–7:00 PM, and Sundays 12:00–4:00 PM.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Julia McCray, Pencils & Pastel

Julia McCray is known for soft realism, depth, and detail that draw you into her pastel landscape and colored pencil still life paintings. Her inspiration is the natural landscape where she lives, the flowers from her garden, vegetables from the farmer’s market, and time-worn household items. Julia strives to depict the quiet beauty she is drawn to in these subjects, and to make the viewer feel a connection to them too. She is especially drawn to atmospheric effects, the play of light and shadow, and achieving believable depth.

Biography

Julia McCray was raised near Corry, Pennsylvania, and has made Tionesta, PA her home for the past 24 years. She became an artist at an early age – 7 or 8 years old – prompted by “Santa’s” gift of an art supply and instruction set. She quickly completed all the lessons in the set, then started drawing Disney characters, flowers in her mother’s garden, and still life arrangements. She focused on business studies in high school, then earned her Interior Decorating Certificate as a more employable creative career option. She returned to art as a hobby in 1986, while living briefly in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Her art training has been self-directed, consisting of online art videos and webinars, art instruction books, and several classes in various mediums with regional artists. Initially working in pencil then progressing to colored pencil, she created colorful, realistic, and extremely detailed floral and still-life pieces. In 2009, she took a pastel workshop to “loosen-up” and was hooked on the medium. While Julia is now focused on creating pastel landscapes, she occasionally returns to her first love, colored pencil, for still-life pieces.

Julia began entering art competitions in 1990 with her colored pencil work, receiving a Best of Show award for her first entry, followed by many more awards at local art shows in Corry and Tionesta. Her work can be found in the homes and offices of patrons, friends, and family across the U.S., including incorporated into the furniture of a local craftsman with whom she frequently collaborates. She has participated in area art events including “Art in the Park” (Corry, PA), “Festival in the Forest” (Tionesta, PA), “Expressions – Celebrating Women Artists of the Oil Region” (Titusville, PA), and “Art on the Allegheny” (Tionesta, PA).

Julia’s participation in the arts on a regional level has included serving on the Pennsylvania Wilds Artisan Trail (recently re-named PA Wilds Cooperative) Advisory Committee. She is co-founder and serves on the board of the Forest Area Arts Council, and established “From the Forest Gallery” in the Forest County Visitor Center in Tionesta in 2012. Julia is also owner of a bed & breakfast and gift shop in Tionesta, where she offers her own work and that of other area artists. Her home studio occupies one of the parlors in her 1886 home, where she encourages other to explore their creativity by offering one-on-one and group art workshops.

Artist Statement

“I am VERY excited about exhibiting at Red Brick! Although I’ve participated and had success in various area art shows/competitions, this will be my first professional exhibit. And it will be a new audience that probably hasn’t seen my work before. Since the Allegheny River is so inspiring for me, exhibiting in Foxburg – along that same river – is perfect for my first show.

Exhibiting with Nancy Yergin is also very appropriate, since we worked together to start building the arts in Forest County. She’s an amazing artist, and our work is both different and complimentary.

Nancy Yergin and I co-founded the Forest Area Arts Council in 2001 because we saw a lot of local talent that was going un-recognized. We wanted to help promote the artists, draw more of them out of their “closets”, and encourage them to think of themselves as artists.

Nancy and I also wanted to provide access to affordable art experiences and education opportunities for everyone in Forest County. FAAC has sponsored events, performances, workshops, residencies, field trips, and many other arts activities that otherwise would not have been available.

Tionesta is becoming a creative community – the basis for its recent economic growth – which probably wouldn’t have occurred without formation of the arts council and its art gallery.  The creation of the gallery was prompted – in part – by the fact Forest County had almost no participating artists/sites on the PA Wilds Artisan Trail.  The gallery was also a way to give visitors access to local artists.  “From the Forest Gallery” is an addition I made to the Forest County Visitor Center in 2012 while I worked there. ”

Nancy Yergin, Paper Collage

With no formal fine-arts background, artist Nancy Yergin learned the basics of collage in a small workshop in 2004 and has continued to develop her own style and application. Her expression of collage and mixed media reflects subjects near and dear to her heart: foods, flowers, and the natural world. She is a juried artist member in the Wilds Cooperative of Pennsylvania and a charter member of the Forest Area Arts Council.

Paper collage is her preferred medium. Using a combination of cut and torn tissue, opaque and hand-crafted Asian papers on stretched canvases, her colorful works are held together with acrylic medium, built layer by layer, and then finished off with pen and ink.

Nancy Yergin is a retired cooperative extension agent with a BS and MS degree in Nutrition from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Her professional life as a registered dietitian dovetailed with her duties of outreach education on health, nutrition and food safety in five NW PA counties. In her base county of Forest, she focused on community development issues, such as eco-tourism and rural access to the arts.

Artist Statement

“When I arrived in Forest County in 1995, I had no sense of myself as an artist – I was a registered dietitian; a county agent for Penn State Cooperative Extension; and a resource in a five-county region on topics that didn’t include art. I taught classes on nutrition, food safety, and assorted health-related topics to adults who hadn’t been in a class room in decades. The job was incredibly busy and there didn’t seem to be time enough in my day to learn more. By my second year on the job, I discovered that I was good at teaching people to learn and utilize concepts to improve their lives. Perhaps now I could improve my own.

What I really wanted to do was to make beautiful things. I already knew I was creative enough to knit, to build a flower/vegetable garden, and raise a child to adulthood. I admired fine art in galleries but couldn’t afford to buy it. I wanted to make my own art. I needed art education. In Forest County, art instruction was available to public school students but not adults.

In 1999 Julia McCray and I put our heads together and began working on an idea to build some sort of organization that would bring the Arts to a rural community. We arranged focus groups and invited the community to contribute. Other people, largely retirees, came on board; some minor grants funding was accessed, and we got the ball rolling. Someone came up with the idea to call ourselves the Forest Area Arts Council (FAAC) so at least we’d have a name. We had to build an organizational structure and find people who were willing to take on responsibilities. We had basket raffles to raise both awareness and funds, and even hired two men to parachute from an airplane onto a nearby field (dressed in Indian regalia) during an annual Festival to play our version of cow-chip bingo.

By 2001, we began to schedule classes, using local and regional artists. We floated the idea of having larger fund-raisers and maybe even an exhibition and competition with judges and prizes. We held art auctions and invited the community to participate, offering them bluebird houses, folding chairs, antique windows, etc. – to re-purpose in whatever way and then return for auction. More people got involved, more classes were offered, and eventually we even attained 501 (c) 3 status and became a non-profit organization. Happily, I earned some promotions largely due to these concrete efforts in community development.

By 2010, I’d taken classes in water-media, ceramics, pastels, papier-mache, wood carving, metal-clay casting, jewelry, and even a blacksmith workshop…all held in the county. A two-hour introduction-to-collage class in 2004 was one that caught my interest and I began teaching myself how to manipulate acrylic medium, papers in all colors and textures, knives, scissors and brushes. The more I did in collage, the more I wanted to do. Creating a collage is much like a slo-mo dive into my own kaleidoscope – with eyes wide open.”

Thirteen years later, retired and nearly 70, I have finally become the artist I knew was inside me. I continue to grow in the craft of collage and have a small studio space in Tionesta Market Village which is full of stretched canvas, frames, and bins of wonderful papers. I sell my art to the public; taking commissions and earning income to supplement my retirement. Even better, I’m still teaching. My students are generally adults who also want to make something beautiful of their own. With a handful of papers, glue and some sharp scissors, they certainly can.”

 

Organ & Piano Duo: Carterette & Moore

ARSENAL DUO
Edward Alan MooreOrgan
Nathan CarterettePiano

Allegheny RiverStone for the Arts is proud to present a “first” for its audience – Concerto masterpieces for orchestra and piano performed on Lincoln Hall’s McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer Organ and Steinway Piano by THE ARSENAL DUO – Nathan Carterette and Edward Alan Moore – on Saturday, October 28, 2017 at 7:30 PM.

Two phenomenal musicians, Edward Alan Moore (organ) and Nathan Carterette (piano) will join forces to play beloved compositions originally written for orchestra and piano and arranged for organ and piano –  including  the first movement from Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto and Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue”.  This will be a concert not to be missed as these brilliant artists bring the breadth and power of major piano concertos to the intimacy of Lincoln Hall.

ARCA audiences will remember Nathan Carterette‘s sensitivity and virtuosic bravura in Foxburg performing a solo concert, “Poets of the Piano” and returning to collaborate with the River City Winds in ARCA’s 10th Anniversary concert. Hailed as “wonderfully poetic,” (Westfalen Post) and “very compelling in his power and presence” (International Composer), Nathan Carterette’s innovative programming has inspired audiences to approach unfamiliar music with open ears, and familiar music with new appreciation. Nathan has recorded the complete piano works of Korean composer, Quentin Kim, and performed Bach’s Goldberg Variations and selections from the Well Tempered Clavier for live audiences on WQED FM; the latter was released as fund raising CD for the station.

Edward Alan Moore is Organist/Music Director at the famed East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, PA. Previously he was a member of the organ faculty at The Catholic University of America Benjamin T. Rome School of Music in Washington, DC, Director of Music Ministries at The Lewinsville Presbyterian Church in McLean, VA, and Minister of Music at National City Christian Church in Washington, DC. As a recitalist, Dr. Moore was the first organist chosen to perform on the Millennium Stage concert series at the Kennedy Center in 2004. Other recitals include those at Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue in New York City, the Cathedral of Saint Philip in Atlanta, Princeton University Chapel, the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, the Interlochen Arts Academy in Interlochen, MI and at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine and the Riverside Church in New York City. He received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in organ performance from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester.

Tickets are $25 Adults, $20 Members, $5 Students  You may reserve tickets by calling 724 659-3153 or may purchase tickets online here.

Just an hour and half north of Pittsburgh, Lincoln Hall’s intimate acoustics provide a truly inspired environment to enjoy chamber music and pianists performing on its seven foot Steinway. Built in 1909, the stage’s backdrop is an original hand-painted canvas of an actual scene downstream on the Allegheny River.  Lincoln Hall has a capacity audience of 120 and is located on the second floor of the Foxburg Free Library.  The McKissick Mighty Wurtlitzer theatre organ, originally installed in Cleveland’s Uptown Theatre in 1928 to accompany silent movies, was lovingly rebuilt by Paul McKissick over eleven years and purchased by Dr. Arthur and Patricia Steffee for Lincoln Hall.  It’s ornate French console and shelf of percussion instruments is a treasure.



Plan to Make a Day of it in beautiful Foxburg!  Enjoy the autumn colors with a walk along the Allegheny River trail or rent bicycles with Foxburg Tours.  Have lunch at the Allegheny Grille with seating overlooking the Allegheny River, or for more casual fare, at Foxburg Pizza with salads, sandwiches and pizza.  Save time to enjoy wine tasting at Foxburg Wine Cellars and savor a gourmet coffee and hand made chocolate at Divani Chocolatier and Barrista.  Or spend the night in the lovely Foxburg Inn.

And of course, before the concert stop by the Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop to enjoy the offerings of talented Cooperative Artists from the region and view the special exhibit of Diane Grguras: Pastel landscapes.  

The Arsenal Duo performing in Stambaugh Auditorium in Youngstown, OH

The Arsenal Duo

Edward Alan Moore and pianist Nathan Carterette have teamed up to form The Arsenal Duo, presenting concerts that unite their respective instruments in a unique and spectacular fashion. They draw from a diverse repertoire, including works originally for piano and orchestra; works original to piano and organ; their own transcriptions; and solo offerings.

Formed in 2013, The Arsenal Duo made their debut performance at Youngstown’s historic Stambaugh Auditorium, where they returned in July 2017 to perform at the American Guild of Organists Great Lakes Regional Convention. They also have been presented in such venues as Wilson College of Chambersburg, PA; National City Christian Church of Washington, DC; Grace and St Stephen’s Church of Colorado Springs, CO; and many others. For more information please visit www.facebook.com/ArsenalDuo or www.youtube.com/ArsenalDuo.

The full program will be posted soon.

Please check back for full details.

Compositions will include works originally written for orchestra and piano and arranged for organ and piano –  including  the first movement from Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto and Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue”.

 

Nathan Carterette

Nathan CarteretteHailed as “wonderfully poetic,” (Westfalen Post) and “very compelling in his power and presence” (International Composer), Nathan Carterette has distinguished himself in the concert world by performing a huge range of works from Elizabethan keyboard music to music written today. His innovative programming has inspired audiences to approach unfamiliar music with open ears, and familiar music with new appreciation.

Nathan has performed in such venues as Weill Recital Hall and the Yamaha Piano Salon of New York City, the Gasteig in Munich, the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe of Hamburg, and Cleveland’s Trinity Cathedral. He has been presented in several universities such as the Berklee School of Music, Cleveland Institute of Music, Radford University, Kent State University, Baldwin Wallace Conservatory, and Carnegie Mellon.

His solo premieres include the U.S. premiere of James MacMillan’s Piano Sonata, the world premiere of Dafydd Llywelyn’s TimeQuake no. VII, part II (Hamburg) and several works of composer Quentin Kim, including Variations on an Ancient Korean Melody and Four Preludes. An adventuresome concerto soloist, Nathan has also played a wide repertoire of works, including Schoenberg’s Piano Concerto, op.42 with the University of Missouri-Kansas City for a Schoenberg Retrospective Festival.

1IMG_9272Educated at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where he studied with Robert Weirich, and Yale University, where he studied with Boris Berman, Nathan Carterette began his piano studies at the age of eleven with Cleveland’s legendary Birute and Anthony Smetona. A chance encounter in 2004 with Welsh composer-pianist Dafydd Llywelyn led to an invitation for intensive private study in Germany, both of the traditional repertoire and Llywelyn’s works.

Nathan has recorded both books of Bach’s monumental Well-Tempered Clavier and the complete solo piano works of Korean composer Quentin Kim. This video recording of his performance of the complete Bach Goldberg Variations in St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh is on youtube.

Dr. Edward Alan Moore

A native of Girard, Ohio, Dr. Edward Alan Moore is Organist/Music Director at East Liberty Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, PA. Previously he was a member of the organ faculty at The Catholic University of America Benjamin T. Rome School of Music in Washington, DC, Director of Music Ministries at The Lewinsville Presbyterian Church in McLean, VA, and Minister of Music at National City Christian Church in Washington, DC. He received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in organ performance from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, studying organ with Michael Farris, improvisation with Gerre Hancock and Richard Erickson, and serving as research assistant for Professor Wm. A. Little.

Edward received the Master of Music degree in organ performance from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, studying organ with Michael Farris and choral music with Fred Stoltzfus and Chester Alwes. He has a Bachelor of Music degree in music and religion from Grove City College in Pennsylvania, where he studied organ with Robert Cornelison and choral music with Douglas Browne. Dr. Moore was a visiting faculty member at the University of Iowa School of Music while Dr. Delbert Disselhorst was on sabbatical and served as guest conductor of the Catholic University of America Chorus while Dr. Leo Nestor was on sabbatical.

As a recitalist, Dr. Moore was the first organist chosen to perform on the Millennium Stage concert series at the Kennedy Center in 2004. Other recitals include those at Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue in New York City, the Cathedral of Saint Philip in Atlanta, Princeton University Chapel, the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, and the Interlochen Arts Academy in Interlochen, MI.

In the past few years Dr. Moore’ performance schedule included concerts at various locations in the Pittsburgh area and at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine and the Riverside Church in New York City. As a choral accompanist, he has been the featured organist with the Washington Bach Consort, Bucks County Choral Society, Fairfax Choral Society, and Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh.

BILLY PRICE BAND
Billy PriceVocals
Steve Delach Guitar
Tom ValentineBass
Dave DoddDrummer
Jimmy BrittonKeyboards
Eric DeFadeSaxophone
SOULFUL FEMMEStevee Wellons & Cheryl Rinovato

If you love rock ‘n’ roll and the blues, whatever you plan to do in the greater Allegheny River Valley Region this fall – DO NOT MISS the SOULFUL, WAILING CONCERT of world class RHYTHM & BLUES with the BILLY PRICE BAND opened by SOULFUL FEMME with Stevee Wellons and Cheryl Rinovato on Saturday, November 4 at 7 PM in Emlenton’s Crawford Center, 511 Hill Street.  You can get down and dance the night away, with lots of room in front of the band in the Crawford Center.

Soulful Femme opens the concert from 7 – 8:00 PM and the Billy Price Band performs from 8:30 to 10:00 PM.  Tickets are Adults $20 and Students $5. This concert will SELL, so be sure to buy online here in advance or reserve at 724-659-3153.  Tickets also will be sold at the door as available, by cash or check only.

The Billy Price Band

Officially recognized as a Pittsburgh Rock ’n Roll Legend, BILLY PRICE has been known for decades as one of the finest soul men in the business. His national and international profile dates back to the early ‘70s when he formed the Rhythm Kings, toured as Roy Buchanan’s singer and later fronted the hugely popular Keystone Rhythm Band.

Billy’s album with recently deceased Chicago soul singer Otis Clay, This Time for Real,  received a 2016 Blues Music Award by the Blues Foundation of Memphis, Tennessee in the category of Best Soul Blues Album.  His band’s fifth CD, Alive and Strange, recorded LIVE and released in April 2017, has “put him on a higher plane” according to Scott Mervis of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.

Being a soul scholar as well as singer, Price shies away from standards and puts his stamp on deeper tracks like Carl Sims’ It Ain’t a Juke Joint Without the Blues, Percy Mayfield’s Nothing Stays the Same Forever and Bobby Byrd’s Never Get Enough.”  (Pittsburgh Post Gazette)  Billy Price has recorded and released a total of 15 albums, CDs, and DVDs.

Soulful Femme

AMAZING GREAT just got even HOTTER – as SOULFUL FEMME opens the concert with the wailing, soulful blues singing of STEVEE WELLONS and the blazing, virtuoso blues guitar playing of CHERYL RINOVATO.  

Having spent years playing blues, soul, jazz and rock music around the country, Stevee Wellons, Cheryl Rinovato and three other seasoned musicians formed the Stevee Wellons Band and they have been burning it up in the Pittsburgh area ever since. In 2016, the Band represented the region in the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, which provided encouragement and inspiration for the group to bring their own mix of blues and soul music to the club and concert circuit in Pennsylvania and record their first full-length CD.

Performing “Blues and Rhythm & Blues for your soul”, Stevee and Cheryl have come together as SOULFUL FEMME with the distilled essence of the larger band.  Opening for Samantha Fish this spring in Pittsburgh, they were on fire, as in the Aretha Franklin tune, Since You’ve Been Gone. 

This is more than a Blues “appetizer” to open the concert… as in a “Tasting” where every course is the best of the best, you will be transported by one of the hottest new blues groups on the circuit – SOULFUL FEMME – and its pairing with the Billy Price Band – right here in the beautiful Allegheny River Valley!

Billy Price has been entertaining audiences in Pittsburgh, Pa., since the early 1970s. In April 2016, he was officially recognized and inducted as a Pittsburgh Rock ’n Roll Legend at an award ceremony sponsored by the Cancer Caring Center of Pittsburgh.

Members of the Billy Price Band are Steve Delach (guitar), Tom Valentine (bass), Dave Dodd (drums), Jimmy Britton (keyboards), and Eric DeFade (tenor sax).

Billy Price first attracted national attention during his three-year association with guitarist Roy Buchanan.  Price is the vocalist on two of Buchanan’s LPs, That’s What I’m Here For and Livestock. The pair toured the U.S. and Canada, playing Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Newport Jazz Festival, the Roxy and Troubadour in Los Angeles, and the Spectrum in Philadelphia.

After leaving Buchanan, Price formed the Keystone Rhythm Band in 1977, which recorded four critically acclaimed LPs, developed a reputation as one of the most exciting touring bands in the U.S., and toured the Eastern US on a circuit that stretched from Boston to Atlanta with large followings in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, DC and North Carolina.   Sustaining several personnel changes, the band performed until 1990. He then formed The Billy Price Band, which currently consists of Steve Delach (guitar), Tom Valentine (bass), Dave Dodd (drums), Jimmy Britton (keyboards), and Eric DeFade (tenor sax).

His album This Time for Real, with recently deceased Chicago soul singer Otis Clay, received a 2016 Blues Music Award by the Blues Foundation of Memphis, Tennessee in the category of Best Soul Blues Album. A live album by the Billy Price Band, Alive and Strange, was released by NolaBlue/Vizztone Label Group in April 2017.

With the Keystone Rhythm Band, the Billy Price Band, and solo projects, Billy Price has recorded and released a total of 15 albums, CDs, and DVDs.

Stevee Wellons and Cheryl Rinovato – seasoned musicians in the Stevee Wellons Band – have been performing together as the duo, SOULFUL FEMME, bringing “Blues and Rhythm & Blues for your Soul” to the club and concert circuit.

STEVEE WELLONS

Stevee Wellons recalls her first performance as toddler in her crib! Stevee’s mother was a pianist and vocalist and taught her the fundamentals of singing. At age 14, Stevee began a singing group with some of her school friends, performing at a few talent shows and ‘dancehall socials’ in her neighborhood.

Stevee began her professional singing career at 21 years of age performing with her former husband in various bands.  She went out on her own performing in supper clubs in the Pittsburgh area and then sang with several popular bands in the city—Shaker, JumpStreet, The Real Deal and the Crusiers, to name a few. Over the years, Stevee has shared the stage with The Dazz Band, Cameo, Howard Hewitt, The Crystals, the Elmonics, The Marcels, the Vogues and many more.

Stevee is also a recording artist, singing lead and background vocals for various artists in Pittsburgh, New York City, Chicago and in DC. She currently sings in Pittsburgh as a freelance vocalist with the Stevee Wellons Band and Soulful Femme. Stevee is a vocal coach and instructor at the Afro-American Music Institute.

CHERYL RINOVATO

Guitarist, Cheryl Rinovato has an applied Music Degree with 2nd major in Arranging and Composition at the famed Berklee College of Music.  Cheryl began her musical career as a studio musician throughout New England.

Since moving to Pittsburgh, Cheryl has had a musical career as a professional musician with numerous area bands.  She also has done extensive studio recording work. Cheryl has been the recipient of the prestigious Jim Weber Award, given to blues guitarist of the year, three times:  In 2012, 2103 and 2015. She also worked with the great Duke Ellington at age 18.

 

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE – APRIL 5, 2017 – SCOTT MERVIS

Pittsburghers have known for decades that Billy Price is one of the finest soul men in the business, and that message was spread a little wider in 2015 when he hooked up with Chicago legend Otis Clay on “This Time for Real.”

In May, Price was in Memphis to pick up best soul blues album at the Blue Music Awards, sadly, a few months after Mr. Clay’s sudden death.

Price — whose career dates back to the early ‘70s when he formed the Rhythm Kings, who toured as Roy Buchanan’s singer and then fronted the hugely popular Keystone Rhythm Band — has had a national and international profile before, but “This Time for Real” put him on a higher plane.

Rather than going the studio route, for the follow-up Price went to the place where he’s shined the most, the live stage. Last September, the Billy Price Band — guitarist Steve Delach, bassist Tom Valentine, drummer Dave Dodd, keyboardist Jimmy Britton and saxophonist Eric DeFade — and a few guests emerged from Club Cafe with his fifth live album, “Alive and Strange,” which will be released on Friday.

Being a soul scholar as well as singer, Price shies away from standards and puts his stamp on deeper tracks like Carl Sims’ “It Ain’t a Juke Joint Without the Blues,” Percy Mayfield’s “Nothing Stays the Same Forever” and Bobby Byrd’s “Never Get Enough.”

So, this is the follow-up to the record with Otis. How did that factor into the idea of making a live album?

Winning the award and getting all the recognition I got from the album with Otis, I wanted to sort of build on that and I thought it was important to establish with the promoters and the people who book big festivals that I had a viable operation going, independently of Otis Clay. So, I wanted to really feature my band on this album, and the statement I’m trying to make is, um, I’ve got a really good band, and you should book us on festivals.

What kind of bump did you get from winning the Blues Music Award?

Well, that was the first album I really ever had good distribution on, through Vizztone. That record had just a lot more radio airplay and a lot more recognition from the blues industry, such as it is. The blues industry is pretty big, it’s a niche industry and you have to get on the circuit and one way to get on the circuit is get played on all the radio shows out there. We got a lot of play on Bluesville on Sirius XM. My name has gotten out there more than it ever has, so I wanted to jump on this and capitalize on that.

This is your fifth live album. How did you go about picking the songs?

I always have a list and I started to think about the songs in my repertoire that are recordable, and I’m not sure how I decide what’s recordable or not, but I guess: “Hasn’t been overdone,” “I’d never done it before,” “It would be something people would want to listen to more frequently,” that kind of thing.

So, let’s talk about a few of them…“Lifestyles of the Poor and Unknown” is a William Bell tune.

This is sort of before William Bell blew up. He has a lot of albums he did on the cheap, maybe five or six of them for his own label. I listen to this disc jockey on the internet a lot. Her name is Cassie Fox, she has a show called Soul of the Blues and she’s really great, she’s from South Carolina. I heard her play that song one day and I wrote to her. I said, “Cassie, what the hell was that? I love that song.” She told me it was a William Bell song, and I taught it to the band with the idea that we’re going to record that one day.

Is it almost unusual at this point for you to hear songs you haven’t heard before, in this genre?

Actually, no. Not at all. I’ll tell you about this other song, “It Ain’t A Juke Joint Without the Blues,” which is one of those things that sticks in your mind forever. This friend of mine, Mike Jaworek, is the booking manager at the Birchmere in Alexandria. He and I share a love for the soul/blues genre. It’s a kind of an obscure genre. It’s really under the radar and not many white people pay attention to it. But it’s sort of the old soul stuff from Stax and Muscle Shoals but a lot dirtier in most cases, a lot raunchier, and produced on the cheap with drum machines and fake horns. It’s a really big in a community in the South of mostly African Americans. Most musicians that I know don’t like it much, for various reasons, but I like it, so Mike told me, “You gotta do ‘It Ain’t A Juke Joint Without the Blues,’ by Carl Sims.” It stuck in my mind, great song, maybe I’ll do it, and I was listening to Cassie’s show and she played something from Carl Sims, so I downloaded a Carl Sims playlist to Spotify and on The Best of Carl Sims was “It Ain’t Juke Joint Without the Blues,” and I said, “OK, I’m going to learn this song. This song would kill.” It’s maybe my favorite on the whole album and it’s one we’re pushing for blues radio. I’ll think it will do well.

Are there others that are particularly special to you?

“Something Strange.” I helped Fred Chapellier write that song for his most recent album. I was encouraging him to think Was (Not Was) for the song but that wasn’t quite his thing. We took it into rehearsal and got a little closer to what I had hoped for for the song, and then started playing it live with an eye toward recording it for this album.

“One More Day” is one I got from Mike Schermer, who goes under the name Mighty Mike Schermer, and he plays guitar with Marcia Ball, but he’s also on Vizztone. He’s a terrific writer, so I met him in Memphis at the Blues Awards last year and I asked him to send me songs and that one jumped out.

Also, we added “Makin’ Plans,” as a bonus track. I wrote it back in the Keystone Rhythm Band days. It’s one of the original songs that didn’t make it onto “Free At Last,” which was the original last KRB album. I wrote it with Mike Karr, who played trumpet and keyboards, and it’s just been around for years and we recorded it for “Strong,” the Billy Price Band album, and again, it didn’t make the cut on that one. It’s always in the back of my mind, I liked it and wondered if we shouldn’t have recorded it then, so we remixed it and it was an opportunity to include it on this album.

I guess you could have gone into the studio and done this, but you wanted to catch the live energy.

Yeah, I did, I did. Actually, Bill Wax who used to program Bluesville on XM radio, I saw him a few months ago in DC and he was kind of wondering why we didn’t go into the studio with this. He said, “Gee, I’d like to hear the full studio treatment on some of these songs,” and he may be right, I’m not sure. I’m pretty sure my next album is going to be all original material, done in the studio.

One Piano-4 Hands: Raim & Wehr, Pianists

Cynthia RaimPianist
David Allen WehrPianist

Celebrate the richness and abundance of the season on Sunday, November 19 at 2 PM as ARCA presents TWO international grand prize winning pianists described as irresistible” by Fanfare Magazine –  CYNTHIA RAIM and DAVID ALLEN WEHR – “two gifted artists egging each other on to ever higher levels of musicianship, virtuosity and sheer fun.”  

ARCA favorite, David Allen Wehr, is joined on Lincoln Hall’s Steinway in “One Piano – 4 Hands” by his piano partner Cynthia Raim, whom ARCA’s audience will remember from their two piano duo concert in Lincoln Hall in 2012 featuring music from their Rachmaninoff CD Suites for Two Pianos.  In a combination of solo piano and four hand works at one piano by  Schubert and Debussy, they will inspire with the subtlety of their collaborative nuances and virtuosity.

Duet repertoire will include Debussy’s charming Petite Suite, Schubert’s dark and passionate Fantasy in F Minor and brilliant Variations on an Original Theme.  Solo works by Debussy will be performed by both pianists, including Estampes (Engravings), a three-movement international musical trio, including Pagodas (Asia), Evening in Granada (Spain) and Gardens in the Rain (France) – and Children’s Corner, Debussy’s loving musial diary of a day in the life of his four-year-old daughter Chouchou.

In the spirit of counting our blessings at Thanksgiving, our ARCA classical-music-loving audience can be grateful to have the bravura and elegance of the award winning CDs of the Raim-Wehr duo LIVE for us in Lincoln Hall.  Cynthia Raim and David Allen Wehr have recorded together three CDs of the music of Brahms, Rachmaninoff and Dvorak – the reviews for which would be the dream of any artist.

Of their CD of Brahms Waltzes, Opus 39 and 21 Hungarian dances, the American Record Guide wrote, “Raim and Wehr offer such luscious performances that they fill one’s soul with sheer joy.  Absolutely gorgeous sound, this disc is a must have.”   And in Fanfare magazine, “Overwhelming Èlan… Raim and Wehr are irresistible.” 

Their Rachamaninoff  Suites for 2 Pianos was named Best Record of the Year 1998 by the American Record Guide:  Atmospheric and enthralling…One would have to go back to the days of Bauer and Gabrilowitsch to find two-piano playing of this caliber. But why bother when there are pianists like Raim and Wehr around. Grab this disc; it doesn’t get any better than this! Record of the Year 1998″

This is a concert with music accessible for all ages – with an eye on those young musicians and pianists who would be delighted by Debussy’s Children’s Corner and amazed by the virtuosity of these extraordinary pianists.  Begin your Thanksgiving holiday early, and bring family and friends with you.

Tickets are $25 for Adults, $20 for ARCA Members and $5 for Students.   Buy online here or call to reserve:  724-659-3153

After the concert Meet the Artists in the Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop after the Concert – view the Cooperative Members’ Holiday Show and perhaps find an early holiday gift for that special person on your list.

And make it a golden fall afternoon on the beautiful banks of the Allegheny River – arriving early for lunch in The Allegheny Grille or Foxburg Pizza, shopping at Foxburg Wine Cellars, or having a coffee and chocolate dessert at Divani Chocolates. 

 

Cynthia Raim, Pianist
David Allen Wehr, Pianist

 

Debussy: Children’s Corner (solo)
Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum
Jimbo’s Lullaby
Serenade for the Doll
The Snow is Dancing
The Little Shepherd
Golliwogg’s Cakewalk

David Allen Wehr, pianist

 

Schubert: Fantasy in F Minor, D. 940 (duet)

 

Debussy: Estampes (solo)
Pagodas
Evening in Granada
Gardens in the Rain

Cynthia Raim, pianist

 

—-Intermission—-

 

Debussy: Petite Suite (duet)
En bateau (Sailing): Andantino
Cortège (Retinue): Moderato
Menuet: Moderato
Ballet: Allegro giusto

 

Schubert: Variations on an Original Theme, D. 813 (duet)

 

Cynthia Raim

“A musician of intelligence and judgment.”   New York Times

“Raim delivered imposing blocks of sound, outlined with hot fingerwork and framed by deliberate, scrupulously measured rhythm.”   Philadelphia Inquirer

Cynthia Raim, piano, who was unanimously chosen as the First Prize winner of the Clara Haskil International Piano Competition, has been acclaimed for her concerto and recital appearances throughout the United States and abroad. In summing up the performance that won Ms. Raim the coveted Clara Haskil prize, La Suisse (Geneva) noted that “Miss Raim showed a musical nature that has gone far beyond technical mastery: Without affectation, without useless bravado, Cynthia Raim has imprinted herself on us and cannot escape our admiration.” Le Monde (Paris) called her “a new Clara Haskil.”

Ms. Raim has won the prestigious Pro Musicis Award and, in 1987, was the first recipient of the “Distinguished Artist Award” of The Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia (America’s oldest continuing musical organization), which was given for “outstanding achievement and artistic merit.” Her many U.S. appearances include Alice Tully Hall, the 92nd Street “Y,” the Kennedy Center, and the Master Keyboard Series of The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.

Ms. Raim has also made numerous radio and television appearances. She has appeared as soloist with leading orchestras in such major cities as Detroit, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Prague, Hamburg, Lausanne and Vienna. She has also participated in many leading international music festivals including Marlboro, Ravinia, Tanglewood, Meadow Brook, Grand Teton, Bard, Mostly Mozart, Santa Fe, Luzern, Montreaux and Sunflower Music Festival. Active in chamber music as well, Ms. Raim has appeared frequently in duo recitals with Benita Valente, David Soyer, Arnold Steinhardt, Samuel Rhodes, and the Guarneri String Quartet. She has recorded for Gallo, Pantheon and Connoisseur Society.

Cynthia Raim is known to Pittsburgh area audiences for having won the First Three Rivers National Piano Competition in 1975. As a result, she was soloist with the Pittsburgh Symphony, playing Prokofiev’s Concerto #3. She has also been heard in Pittsburgh as collaborative pianist with soprano Benita Valente, with whom she recorded and toured widely for many years.

A native of Detroit, where she first studied with Mischa Kottler, Ms. Raim was the youngest soloist to ever perform a complete concerto with the Detroit Symphony. Before graduating in 1977 from the Curtis Institute of Music, where she studied with Rudolf Serkin and Mieczslaw Horszowski, Ms. Raim had won the Festorazzi Award for Most Promising Pianist at Curtis, as well as first prize in the J.S. Bach International Competition.

David Allen Wehr

“Wehr belongs to the high-powered school of American pianism, but has a depth and sensitivity rarely encountered.” London Guardian

“David Allen Wehr is one of those great talents who play circles around most of their contemporaries. Few pianists have so consistently produced such exemplary, idiomatic, intellectually rigorous and emotionally generous music. He is an uncommonly free, expressive player whose huge but unobtrusive technical apparatus never draws attention to itself but is put squarely in the service of musical values. He is more than a pianist’s pianist; he is a musician’s musician.” American Record Guide

David Allen Wehr holds the Jack W. Geltz Distinguished Piano Chair at the Mary Pappert School of Music. His international career was launched when he won the Gold Medal at the 1987 Santander International Piano Competition in Spain. The resulting tours have taken him to over 30 countries in Europe, North and South America, and the Far East, including performances in the world musical capitals of New York, London, Paris, Vienna, Washington, Madrid and Buenos Aires. Over 1,000 concerts include 13 seasons of touring the United States and Canada for Community Concerts as soloist, pianist with the Sartory Trio, and duo-recital partner with violinist Linda Wang and cellist Zuill Bailey. Wehr has been soloist with the London Symphony, National Symphony, Chautauqua Symphony, Houston Symphony, New Zealand Symphony and all the major Spanish and Latin American orchestras.

David Allen Wehr was born in Princeton, New Jersey, into a family of professional musicians, his parents both being graduates of the famed Westminster Choir College. His father, Dr. David A. Wehr, well-known composer of over fifty published choir anthems, founded the Cathedral Bellchoir, one of the country’s first. The ringers’ extensive cross-country tours in the 1960s included concerts at the Seattle, New York and Montreal World’s Fairs. His mother, Nancy Stone Wehr, is a leading music educator and alto soloist.

Growing up in Boise, Idaho, where his parents directed the choir program at the Cathedral of the Rockies, young David’s first piano lesson with his mother was on his fourth birthday. After continued lessons with both parents until age twelve, Wehr studied with Peggy Neighbors Erwin in Miami, Florida and with Edward Zolas at the Cleveland Institute of Music.

Wehr studied at the Cleveland Institute of Music, the Taos School of Music, the Dartington Summer Music School in England, and holds Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from the University of Kansas, where he studied with Portuguese virtuoso Sequeira Costa and coached in over forty master classes with Leon Fleisher, Malcolm Frager, Misha Dichter, Gary Graffman and Byron Janis.  He coached extensively with Leon Fleisher, Jorge Bolet and Malcolm Frager. Early in his career, Wehr won the 1975 Kosciuszko Chopin Prize in New York City, the 1983 National Federation of Music Clubs Young Artist Award, and Second Prizes in the 1983 Naumburg International Piano Competition at New York’s Carnegie Hall, and the 1986 Kapell Competition at the Kennedy Center.  He also worked coaching chamber music at the Taos School of Music with Anne Koscielny, Raymond Hanson and the New Hungarian String Quartet.

David Allen Wehr has amassed a large and critically acclaimed discography with Connoisseur Society, Inc., with programs by Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninoff, Mussorgsky, Schumann, Delius, Czerny, Gershwin, Brahms, Griffes, Wagner-Liszt, Dvoř-k and Joe Utterback. The complete Beethoven Sonata Cycle has been released in four double-CD albums. His CDs are available through the Mary Pappert School of Music by calling (412) 396-6082 and at amazon.com. Since 2007, Wehr has served each summer as Principal Keyboard at the Sunflower Music Festival in Topeka, Kansas and the Buzzards Bay Musicfest in Marion, Massachusetts.

Wehr was first associated with Duquesne from 1991-1994, when the Sartory Trio was chamber ensemble-in-residence, and his current tenure began in 2001, when he was named the first Hillman Distinguished Chair. His previous performance projects here include the complete Beethoven Sonata Cycle (2002-2004), Beethoven’s “Dynamic Duos”: the complete violin-piano sonatas with Charles Stegeman, the complete works for cello and piano with Anne Martindale Williams, and the Ninth Symphony in Liszt’s two-piano transcription with Helene Wickett (2004), “Brahms on the Bluff”, (Brahms’ complete instrumental chamber music, 2005-2008), “Musique on the Bluff” (French music, 2008-2010), “Bicentennials on the Bluff” (Chopin and Schumann, 2010), “Dvořák at Duquesne” (2011), and “Budapest on the Bluff” (2012) and “Beethoven on the Bluff” (2013-14) presenting the major piano chamber works of Beethoven.

Pianists Cynthia Raim and David Allen Wehr bring to Foxburg a program they have performed to sold out audiences as part of Duquesne University’s Schubert on the Bluff, in the third and final season also featuring feature guest composer Claude Debussy. Schubert’s gorgeous melodies and emotionally gripping music has captivated audiences for almost two centuries, while Debussy’s lush, Impressionistic tone paintings have placed him among the giants of the 20th century. For the 16th season, David Allen Wehr, holder of the Jack W. Geltz Distinguished Piano Chair at Duquesne University, serves as Artistic Director of the series.

ARCA audiences will remember Cynthia Raim and David Allen Wehr from their two piano duo concert in Lincoln Hall in 2012 featuring music from their Rachmaninoff CD Suites for Two Pianos.  They will perform a combination of solo piano and four hand works at one piano by Schubert and Debussy.

Duet repertoire will include Debussy’s charming Petite Suite, Schubert’s dark and passionate Fantasy in F Minor and brilliant Variations on an Original Theme.  Colorful and virtuosic solo works by Debussy will be performed by both pianists  including Estampes (Engravings), a three-movement international musical trio, including Pagodas (Asia), Evening in Granada (Spain) and Gardens in the Rain (France) – and Children’s Corner, Debussy’s loving musial diary of a day in the life of his four-year-old daughter Chouchou.

“Estampes (Engravings)” is a three-movement international musical tour, including Pagodas (Asia), Evening in Granada (Spain) and Gardens in the Rain (France).  “Children’s Corner” is Debussy’s loving musical diary of a day in the life of his four-year-old daughter Chouchou.  There are six pieces in the suite, each with an English-language title.  The choice of language is most likely Debussy’s nod towards Chou-Chou’s English governess. The pieces are Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, Jimbo’s Lullaby, Serenade for the Doll, The Snow is Dancing, The Little Shepherd and Golliwogg’s Cakewalk.

Program Host – David Allen Wehr
Back by popular demand and a favorite of Foxburg audiences, David Allen Wehr will serve as the program host for the concert providing enlightening insights on the music and composers.  David’s international career was launched when he won the Gold Medal at the 1987 Santander International Piano Competition in Spain. The resulting tours have taken him to over 30 countries in Europe, North and South America, and the Far East, including performances in the world musical capitals of New York, London, Paris, Vienna, Washington, Madrid and Buenos Aires

It was David’s thirteen seasons touring the United States and Canada for Community concerts as a soloist and in chamber music partnerships that honed his unique ability to make great works for the piano accessible to the public.  Known for his ability as a “Living Program Note”, Dave has a warm personality that welcomes an audience member into the emotion of the music and makes imaginative and simple the intricacies of great works of music.

As program host, David is once again certain to charm and delight ARCA audiences.

David Wickerham - Version 2

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAY SEASON as Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts proudly presents the keyboard artistry and improvisational genius of audience favorite DAVE WICKERHAM in his celebrated CHRISTMAS CONCERT on Sunday, December 17 at 2:00 PM in Lincoln Hall – followed by a Holiday reception in the Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop.

No one makes the Lincoln Hall’s McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre organ sound more glorious, and, with his brilliant theatre organ arrangements and improvisation of audience requests, no one entertains our appreciative and enthusiastic audience better than Dave Wickerham!  This is truly world class theatre organ artistry from one of the kindest, gentlest and most generous souls… evidenced by the glow you will feel after having experienced his inspiring performance.  You will be ready for the holidays with the joy and spirit of this concert.

This is the perfect Holiday gift for those special people on your list – who will be honored to experience his music making inspired by the message of the Season.

Dave Wickerham’s concerts sell out, so be sure to reserve your tickets early.  Adults $25, Members $20, Students $5.  You may purchase tickets online here or call to reserve:  724 659-3153

ARCA’s McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer Organ

McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Organ – www.denniskeyesphotography.com

ARCA’s Wurlitzer contains seventeen ranks of pipes and is characterized by a balanced blend of unmistakeable Wurlitzer ‘sounds”.  Built in 1928 at the Wurlitzer Organ factory in North Tonawanda outside of Buffalo and numbered OPUS 1989, the organ originally was installed in Cleveland’s Uptown Theatre.  It was played for several years accompanying silent movies.  With the end of the silent film era it was subsequently purchased by Richard Wheeler, a Cleveland organist, and remained in his home until Wheeler passed.  Paul McKissick purchased it from the Haynes Company in North Canton, Ohio, where it had been in storage.

Named for Paul McKissick, who lovingly and painstakingly rebuilt the instrument over eleven years, in 1999 the restored Wulrtlizer was installed in McKissick’s garage at their home in Lake Latonka near Mercer, PA.  The organ became known as the Latona Pipes, and was played in annual benefits concerts to raise money for the DeBence Museum in Franklin.  Dr. Arthur and Patricia Steffee attended one of the concerts.  When Paul decided to downsize and was seeking a place for the Wurtlizer for the next generation, Dr. Arthur and Patricia Steffee, ARCA’s founders, purchased it to enhance the newly restored Lincoln Hall, on the second floor of the Foxburg Free Library.

Its seventeen ranks of pipes translate to 60 notes per voice or rank, more than 1200 pipes and 6,000 moving parts to make the Wurlitzer sound.  Only the relay and computer are not authentic or vintage parts on the organ.  The installation included one of Wurlitzer’s most unique features, the decorative ‘Toy Shelf’ of miniature instruments, which are displayed in a rear balcony in Lincoln Hall and are all powered by the organ. The marimba was added and all the associated drums, cymbals, bells and automatic piano produce a balanced blend of unmistakable Mighty Wurlitzer sounds.

ARCA audiences have enjoyed ten years of glorious music making on the McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer by some of the worlds greatest theatre organists – including David Wickerham, Martin Ellis, Walt Strony, Scott Foppiano, Donna Parker, Jelani Eddington and Ken Double.  Jason Wiles is ARCA’s organ technician, maintaining and tuning the organ for each concert.

In 2012, the McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer Legacy Fund was established in honor of Paul and Sally McKissick, to maintain the organ and insure the future of this extraordinary instrument for future audiences.  Anyone wishing to contribute to this fund may do so by contacting ARCA at info@alleghenyriverstone.org.

See more on the Paul McKissick Story and the McKissick Mighty Wurlitzer organ.

About the Artist

Unknown-1Dave Wickerham was born in Encino, California in 1962. He began playing the electronic organ at the age of four and had his first pipe organ experience at age10. His musical education started at age 7.  When he moved to Arizona in 1976, he became Associate Organist at the famous Organ Stop Pizza Restaurants in Phoenix, Mesa and Tucson. While in Arizona, he continued his musical studies with Roseamond Crowley, one of the few remaining descendants of the Louis Vierne line of organists. He attended the University of Arizona in Tucson on a full scholarship, pursuing classical organ studies for six years with Dr. Roy Johnson.  In 1984, Dave moved to the Chicago area to become Staff Organist at Pipes and Pizza in Lansing, Illinois. In addition to his performance there, he concertized frequently, as well as ministering musically and serving at various churches.

August of 1990 found the Wickerham family – Dave, his wife and two young children – moving to Wisconsin, where he was one of the featured Staff Organists at the Piper Music Palace in Greenfield, a position he held for 10 years.

In the spring of 2000, Dave ushered in the new millennium with a limited special engagement, as a featured organist at “Roxy’s Pipe Organ Pizzeria”, part of a $26,000,000 expansion phase at the FIESTA Casino and Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Wickerham’s, Dave, Rhonda, and now three great kids, spent a year and a half there before returning back home to Wisconsin in August of 2001… For the next three years, Dave resumed his position at the Piper Music Palace and was also the Principal Organist at Williams Bay Lutheran Church in Lake Geneva, WI.

UnknownHe enjoys concertizing frequently to many audiences including various chapters of the American Theatre Organ Society. In April of 1999, he took great pleasure being a feature artist in Melbourne, Australia for the convention of the Theatre Organ Society of Australia for which he received rave reviews. He returned “Down Under” for a six-week concert tour in Australia and New Zealand during the summer of 2003 and very recently has completed a similar tour concluding November of 2012.

Dave also enjoys recording and has recently “sold out” his fourth CD “Sounds of Music” recorded on the famous 5 Manual, 80 Rank Theatre Organ at the Sanfilippo Residence in Barrington, IL. There are two NEW recording projects that are soon to be completed and released.

After seven years as Organist – Curator with the legendary Milhous Collection in South Florida, Dave and his family currently enjoy living in Upper Michigan where he has accepted the position of Co-Manager and Organist in Residence at Crystal Theatre in Crystal Falls. This 1927 theatre is now a regional Performing Arts Center and houses a 3 manual, 21 rank Moller theatre organ that Dave also looks after. Additionaly, his wife Rhonda – at his side – works as Co-Manager of this beautiful and historic venue.

Click the Wurlitzer menu item above to learn about the history of the Mighty McKissick Wurlitzer and Paul McKissick. Then, reserve your seat for this special holiday Wurlitzer concert featuring an artist who delights audiences both young and old. Once you hear the majesty and capability of a Theatre Organ, you will be hooked!

A perennial Holiday Season favorite, The Madrigal Dinner Theatre, returns for two evenings, December 8th and 9th, to Foxburg’s candlelit Lincoln Hall.  Come join us for a Holiday Wassail Toast, Medieval Feast and holiday entertainment fit for a King and Queen!

The Madrigal Dinner Theatre has been a sell-out each year.   Be sure to reserve your spots early since only 79 seats are available for each performance.  You may buy tickets online here or reserve by calling 724 659-3153.  

Madrigal Dinner-Lincoln Hall 2014

Madrigal Window DecorationsLincoln Hall is transformed into a candlelit Medieval banquet hall with banners and coats of arms reminiscent of England in the Middle Ages.  This re-creation of a Medieval period Boar’s Head Festival dinner is replete with choral musical selections – madrigal songs and holiday carols – woven within a Christmas play with pageantry and costumes, all while enjoying a multi-course medieval feast and wassail toasts to the season.

Madrigal Dinner Producer Cathy Powell was inspired to create the event after experiencing a medieval dinner at Bunratty Castle near, Limmerick, Ireland in 1992. The Medieval Madrigal Dinner is based on the Boar’s Head Ceremony. It is the oldest continuing ceremony of the Christmas season, presented as early as 1340 at Queen’s College in Oxford, England and in time becoming part of Christmas celebrations in the great manor houses of England.

5254c8c2-b79c-46eb-8472-645cc07e14fbThe king and queen arrive in grand flourish and invite all in attendance to share in a festive dinner. A prayer is offered by a monk to bless the meal. The Madrigal Singers, adorned in period costumes, entertain with madrigal songs and traditional holiday carols. They serve each course of the holiday feast, unfolding at the same time the Christmas story set to music. Think of it as an ancient form of dinner theatre.

You’ll believe you’re experiencing musical Yuletide cheer and conviviality as if living for a moment in a bygone era.  The ancient Boar’s Head Festival being reenacted around the Christmas story is not one of times past and gone – but rather is a living story told by modern day minstrels, echoing within each of us the spirit and love of the Season.

 

ABOUT THE CONCERT

The Madrigal Dinner has become a Foxburg Christmas Tradition since it moved from Emlenton’s First Methodist Church to Lincoln Hall nine years ago! This year the Madrigal Dinner marks its 21st Performance Season.

Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts and the Madrigal Singers transform Lincoln Hall into a grand banquet hall reminiscent of Medieval England. Candlelit tables, banners and coats of arms give one a sense of the majesty enjoyed by a select few.

The king and queen arrive in grand flourish and invite all in attendance to share in a festive dinner. A prayer is offered by a monk to bless the meal.  The Madrigal Singers, adorned in period costumes, entertain with madrigal songs and traditional holiday carols. They serve each course of the holiday feast, at the same time unfolding a story set to music. Think of it as an ancient form of dinner theatre.

Madrigal Dinner 2014.2

Madrigal Dinner in Lincoln Hall 2014

The menu for each night is representative of typical medieval dinner fare of the time and is yours to enjoy–spoon in hand!  Last year the menu created and prepared by Julie Findlan Powell of Little It Deli includes from 15th century England “Pullus Iuvenis” (stuffed chicken with bread pork stuffing with raisins and eggs) and “Brawn en Peuerade” (pulled pork in wine sauce) and from 16th century Ireland “Colcannon” (mashed potatoes with cabbage, bacon and cheese). Finishing the meal were cooked carrots with cinnamon and butter, fresh baked bread, and for dessert bread pudding with vanilla rum sauce. Of course, no meal back then was complete without continuous goblets of wassail and this beverage flows freely.

The meal is divided into courses and each is heralded with a traditional song. A play is performed between courses and a concert of choral music concludes the festivities. The dinner is intended to imitate a meal that might have been served during the Middle Ages.

DSC03473 Madrigal Cast

Madrigal Dinner 2008 in Lincoln Hall – Trevor Hile, Norma Baum, Cathy Powell, Anna Lowrey, Julie Findlan Powell

Madrigal Dinner producer Cathy Powell is grateful to all who have helped created this popular holiday event: “What started as an idea to add entertainment to a long forgotten event, “Christmas in Oil Country”, has become a tradition in its own right. The Madrigal Dinner could not have happened without the dedication and participation of many people. I feel so much gratitude for my family and friends (who also feel like family because they’ve participated for so many years) for taking time out of their busy lives to rehearse, perform, make costumes, cook, and serve this dinner.  Words can’t express the love I have for these wonderful talented people. While my son Jeffrey Powell has been a singer and my daughter Jennifer Lowrey has served as musical director since its inception, most gratifying is that some of my grandchildren also have joyously embraced this tradition and now sing in my place. I couldn’t be happier.”

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Jump start your family’s Holiday enjoyment with this Foxburg Christmas tradition presented by the Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts!

The Madrigal Dinner has been a sell-out each year.   Be sure to reserve your spots early for these 20th Performance year events — because only 70 seats are available for each performance.

Madrigal Dinner ticket prices will be announced soon.  You may buy tickets online here or reserve by calling 724 659-3153.

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The History of Emlenton/Foxburg’s Madrigal Dinner

The First performance of the Madrigal Dinner was held in The Emlenton United Methodist Church Social Hall in November 1994 providing entertainment for an annual Emlenton event begun the year before called “Christmas in Oil Country”.

The Madrigal Dinner, sponsored by The Emlenton Civic Club and The Emlenton United Methodist Church, was conceived by two owners of Bed and Breakfasts in Emlenton, Terry Johnson-Cooney (owner of Apple Alley) and Cathy Powell (co-owner of The Barnard House). Cathy Powell had been inspired by a medieval dinner that she experienced at Bunratty Castle near, Limmerick, Ireland in 1992.

Carrying the Boar 2008 - Jim Robertson, Ken Hanby & Bruce Donaldson

Carrying the Boar’s Head 2008 – Jim Robertson, Ken Hanby & Bruce Donaldson

The Medieval Madrigal Dinner is based on the Boar’s Head Ceremony, which is the oldest continuing ceremony of the Christmas season, having been presented as early as 1340 at Queen’s College in Oxford, England.  In time the Boar’s Head Ceremony became part of Christmas celebrations in the great manor houses of England.

The Derrick article and photo below show former ARCA Board member “Lady” Roberta Newton, “Sir” Terrence Johnson-Cooney, “Lady” Jenny Powell and the Boars’ Head.

Madrigal.Articles Page 1 copy

Producing the first Madrigal Dinner took intensive planning as well as the cooperation and hard work of many Emlentonians. Cathy Powell served as Producer for the event, lining up the singers and organizing all details of the first Boars Head Celebration. Cathy provided the music and background material on the event used to develop a script following the customs of the medieval boars head dinner.

Terry Johnson-Cooney also contributed background literature and an abundance of brocade fabric from drapes hanging in his residence prior to its transformation into Apple Alley Bed and Breakfast. There was enough fabric to make many of the costumes used in the first performance. Cathy’s future daughter-in-law, Julie Findlan, who at the time was obtaining her master’s degree in costuming at Penn State University, took charge of costuming the group; she used the donated fabric and borrowed some items from the university. Under Julie’s guidance, several volunteers helped sew the costumes. Area resident and pianist, Roberta Newton, took charge of instrumental music which in the first season was harpsichord and brass. Roberta engaged instrumentalists from Clarion University and played her own harpsichord.

Over 100 people attended the first Madrigal Dinner in Emlenton in 1994. Because of its popular success and the considerable efforts of so many, it was decided to make it an annual event.

This article from the Derrick in 1996 – the third year of the Madrigal Dinner – shows Jeff Powell making one of the toasts to the evening.  Even to this day Madrigal Dinner attendees raise their glasses of wassail throughout the evening to celebrate the season as audience members and singers make toasts to the season.

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This photo Progress News article from 2007 –  its last year in Emlenton’s United Methodist Church – shows the richness and detail of the costumes worn by the Madrigal Singers, which began more than twenty years ago as costumes refashioned from brocade drapes.

Madrigal 2007 copy

Terry Johnson-Cooney was the first Lord hosting the dinner and Debe Southworth was the first Lady. In 1994 ten singers provided the vocals for the first madrigal dinner: Sopranos; Carrie Morrison Armogost Jennifer Powell,  Cammy Werkheiser,  Altos: Norma Baum, Cathy Powell, Kristin Baum, Tenors; Dick Carr, Jeff Powell, basses; Jerry Baum, Bruce Donaldson. The group always has been under the vocal direction of Jenny Powell Lowrey.

The first boar’s head used was made of paper machete as seen in the photo above – and not very realistic. Since then the Madrigal Dinner has had three authentic boar’s heads. One was purchased on e-bay and another resulting from a boar hunt in the west provided by singer Ken Hanby’s son-in-law, Dr. Michael Evancovich. The third also was acquired by Dr. Evancovich.

Food for the first dinner was prepared and provided by the members of the Emlenton Methodist Church, eaten without the aid of a fork to follow the customs of medieval times.  The meal also has changed over the years.  Julie Findlan-Powell initially researched medieval recipes, from which group members prepared dishes and then voted on their favorites. After tweaking the recipes to appeal to the contemporary pallet, the Madrigal Dinner meal served in ARCA’s Lincoln Hall is derived from those original recipes.  For many years dinners were catered by Cindy and Rod Morrison, parents of madrigal singer Carrie Armogost.  In recent years dinners have been catered by Little It Deli, restaurant owned and operated by Jeff Powell, Julie Findlan-Powell, and Kristie Palmer.

Early decorations were traditional greens and candles on the tables. Throughout the years, many decorative effects have been created to enhance the madrigal experience. The colorful flags emblazoned in Lincoln Hall are based on authentic family crests of many of the singers and were designed and sewn by former singers, Alice Shoup and Cathy Powell.

Over the year costumes also have changed. A second more complete group of costumes were designed by Julie Findlan-Powell.  The costumes worn today have been purchased from a costume company. A tambourine and an Irish drum have been acquired. In 2000 the madrigal group made a CD of songs sung at the dinner, which were made available for sale at the dinner.  Because in 2006 no dinner was held, the Madrigal Dinners of 2015 mark the Twentieth Anniversary Performance Season.

All of the madrigal singers in the group reside or have roots in the Allegheny-Clarion River Valley or Knox area. Over the years the group has been blessed with many talented instrumentalists, some of whom sing and perform brass fanfares. It truly is remarkable that in such a sparsely populated area a group of talented and accomplished people have come together, providing harpsichords, lutes, and Irish drums; contributing their talents to costume and cater; and creating and maintaining the excellent quality of entertainment which this event provides. Some of the younger singers are third generation and even more passionate about singing in this group than their parents; one young woman returns from her college in Berea, Ohio to participate.

renaissancechoirMost wonderful is that so many attendees have traveled long distances to attend the Madrigal Dinner since its inception. Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts is proud to be celebrating the group’s Twentieth Anniversary Performance.

Become one of the devoted Madrigal Dinner participants who have treasured this experience and returned year after year to experience its wonder and magic.  We invite you to open your 2015 holiday season with us on either Friday or Saturday, December 8 or 9, 2017 at 7:00 PM in Lincoln Hall.  We look forward to toasting the evening and celebrating the Season with you.

 

 

Pittsburgh Symphony Brass
George VosburghTrumpet
Neil BerntsenTrumpet
William CaballeroHorn
Peter SullivanTrombone
Craig KnoxTuba
Merry Christmas

Let the trumpets sound!  There is no more inspirational way to begin Christmas week than to give yourself the gift of music performed by the world celebrated Pittsburgh Symphony Brass in Foxburg’s beautiful Memorial Church of Our Father on Sunday, December 10 at 7:00 PM.

Foxburg’s beautiful neo-Gothic Memorial Church of Our Father, gloriously bedecked with poinsettias, will be the exquisite holiday setting for this perennial favorite.  The intimate atmosphere and superb acoustics of this beautiful stone church will resound with stirring strains of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Brass Ensemble – some of the most superbly talented brass musicians in the world – right here in the beautiful Allegheny-Clarion River Valley for your holiday inspiration.

Call to reserve your tickets for this audience and holiday favorite:  724-659-3153  or buy online here.  Tickets:  Adults $30, Members $25, Students $5  Parking is at the AC Valley Medical Center, up the hill from the church, one-half mile, on route 58, across from the A-C Valley Schools  Shuttle service to and from the church will be provided.  The shuttles will begin an hour before the performance, at 6:00 PM.

Performing works from their three acclaimed Christmas CDs (available on Amazon), Pittsburgh Symphony Brass is led by Grammy award winner George Vosburgh.  The group possesses a unique blend of virtuosity with brilliant sonority rarely achieved in brass music.  Organized in 1994 and featuring some of the world’s finest orchestral brass musicians playing in chamber ensemble, the ensemble endeavors to stretch the limitations of performance and explore a wide range of musical expression rarely achieved in brass music.

pso-brass-albums-copy“Brass ensemble playing cannot possibly be more virtuosic or musical…” — Sir Andre Previn

You will be uplifted and delighted by the elegant arrangements of Christmas favorites from the PSO Brass’ Christmas CDs.  Their concerts have been described as “Holiday cheer delivered with virtuoso flair.”  AND you will be entertained!  ARCA audiences have been charmed by the friendly and jovial spoken introductions the PSO Brass musicians offer as they take you on a Holiday musical journey in styles ranging from the traditional to Spike Jones.  It promises to be a holiday favorite you will want to make an annual tradition.

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Photography by denniskeyesphotography.com

These world renowned brass musicians are led by Grammy Award winner and PSO Principal Trumpet, George Vosburgh who in 1987 won the Grammy for Best New Classical Artist. Internationally acclaimed for his virtuosity on the trumpet in recordings, concerts, and recitals, Vosburgh has appeared as a soloist in such locales as the Bonn Festival, Ravinia Festival, and the Curs International de Musica in Valencia, Spain. After his tenure as the youngest member of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s world famous brass section under the late Sir George Solti, Vosburgh joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra as Principal Trumpet in 1992.

Before the concert, plan to tour the beautiful Holiday Exhibit at the Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop, and pick up a gift for this special people on your Christmas list – or for yourself – from the affordable, unique hand-made artwork of Red Brick Cooperative Artists.  On Sunday, December 18, the Red Brick Gallery is open from 12 to 4 PM.  Before the concert, you also may wish to enjoy supper at the Allegheny Grille or Foxburg Pizza, and a gourmet coffee and dessert at Divani Chocolatier.  Or plan to spend the night where every room overlooks the Allegheny River at the Foxburg Inn Hotel.

Then drive your car to the AC Valley Medical Center, up the hill from the church, one-half mile, on route 58, across from the A-C Valley Schools  Shuttle service to and from the church will be provided.  The shuttles will begin an hour before the performance, at 6:00 PM.

ABOUT THE CONCERT

Foxburg’s beautiful neo-Gothic Memorial Church of Our Father constructed by Hannah Fox of the Fox family, Foxburg’s namesake, will resound with glorious strains of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Brass Ensemble on Sunday, December 18 at 7:00 PM.  The  stone church, boasts an intimate atmosphere and superb acoustics, made more compelling by the poinsettias adorning the sanctuary – an ideal environment for this concert of traditional Christmas favorites performed by some of the most celebrated brass musicians in the world.  Join us for “The Spirit of Christmas”, an auspicious beginning of Christmas week.

You will be uplifted and delighted by the elegant arrangements of Christmas favorites from the PSO Brass’ Christmas CDs.  Their concerts have been described as “Holiday cheer delivered with virtuoso flair.”  AND you will be entertained!  ARCA audiences have been charmed by the friendly and jovial spoken introductions the PSO Brass musicians offer as they take you on a Holiday musical journey in styles ranging from the traditional to Spike Jones.  It promises to be a holiday favorite you will want to make an annual tradition.

Join us for the closing concert of ARCA’s 2016 season, keeping your joyous spirits high for Christmas-only as week later! Indeed, let the trumpets sound!!

For the December 10 concert of the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass, parking will be in the AC Valley Medical Center, opposite the AC Valley Schools, up the hill from the church, one-half mile, on route 58.  Shuttle service to the church will begin an hour before the performance, at 6:00 PM.

Google Maps

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

006_6-300x198 - Version 2Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Brass Ensemble is comprised of Principal Players in the Pittsburgh Symphony including George Vosburgh, PSO Principal Trumpet; Neal Berntsen, PSO Trumpet; William Caballero, PSO Principal Horn; Peter Sullivan, PSO Principal Trombone; and Craig Knox, PSO Principal Tuba.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Brass was organized by George Vosburgh in 1994 with an emphasis on featuring some of the world’s finest orchestral brass musicians playing in chamber ensemble. The result has been a unique blend of virtuosity with brilliant sonority usually associated with orchestral brass. The ensemble, all of whom are members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, endeavors to stretch the limitations of performance and explore a wide range of musical expression rarely achieved in brass music.

The American Record Guide described the ensemble’s first compact disc, J.S. Bach, The Art of Fugue for the Four Winds record label as “Magnificent, an extended example of first rate playing, with beautiful tone qualities, impeccable intonation, and polished execution.” The ensemble’s second recording, ” A Christmas Concert”, has been described by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette as, “Holiday cheer delivered with virtuoso flair.” At a recent concert for the Frick Art and Historical Center, Mark Kanny, music critic for the Tribune-Review, described the concert as “impressively polished.” After a concert for the Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society the Tribune-Review wrote, “Full of brilliance and power, but also stunning in subtle artistic qualities made possible only by masterful control”.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Brass released a third compact disc in 2002. This recording, Cantate Hodie for the Clarion label is in collaboration with the Bach Choir of Pittsburgh and features contemporary works based on Christmas themes for mixed chorus, brass, and organ. The groups fourth and fifth recordings, The Spirit of Christmas (2003) and A Song of Christmas (2008-both for Four Winds) again received great reviews. Music performed by the PSO Brass can also be found on The American Girl’s Christmas, Music of Christmas Past. The groups association with the American Gramophone label has resulted in partnerships on that label’s Holiday Musik II and Renaissance Holiday recordings.

The group’s featured performance on National Public Radio’s Performance Today is replayed annually on NPR stations throughout the United States. The PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY BRASS has performed in Italy, Canada and the United States.

George Vosburgh, trumpet
Neal Berntsen, trumpet
William Caballero, horn
Peter Sullivan, trombone
TBA, bass trombone
Craig Knox, tuba

 

George Vosburgh
Principal Trumpet

George Vosburgh, celebrated soloist and lecturer is internationally acclaimed for his virtuosity on vosburgh_george-1the trumpet in recordings, concerts and recitals, as well as many guest artist performances in such locales as the Bonn Festival at Rolandsek, Germany, the Ravinia Festival, Chicago, and the Curs Internacional de Musica in Valencia, Spain. In 1992 he joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra as Principal Trumpet.

The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences awarded George Vosburgh a Grammy as Best New Classical Artist in 1985 for the Reference recording of Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du Soldat with Chicago Pro Musica.  He is a Bavarian Radio International Music Competition prize winner and a Gold and Platinum Record recipient for his work with the New Age music ensemble Mannheim Steamroller.  In 2003 he was invited to become Principal Trumpet of the World Orchestra for Peace under the direction of Valery Gergiev. The orchestra has since performed on tour across Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, and produced many recordings and television programs.

Recordings featuring George Vosburgh include Trumpeter’s Heritage, music by Bach, Böhme, Tomasi, Fasch, and Neruda with the Czech Philharmonic and Arnie Roth conducting, Trumpet Masterworks, pieces for trumpet and piano with Alaine Fink, and Four Trumpet Concerti, works by Haydn, Hummel, Telemann, and Leopold Mozart with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and Gerard Schwarz conducting. All recordings are featured on the Four Winds label.

In 1994, Mr. Vosburgh organized the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass, a unique brass ensemble featuring some of the world’s finest orchestral brass musicians in chamber ensemble.  Since 1998, the Brass has enjoyed a flurry of recording and performance activity, releasing five CDs, including Bach’s The Art of Fugue on the Four Winds label.

As an educator, Mr. Vosburgh has appeared in universities across Europe, Asia, and the United States, including Northwestern University, University of Michigan, UCLA, and Tokyo Music Academy, as well as the Tanglewood Fellowship program.  He has lectured at the International Trumpet Guild’s annual conference and recently published a critical edition of the Böhme Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra in E minor published by Vosburgh Music Inc.  He is currently on the faculty of Duquesne University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Mr. Vosburgh is a graduate of the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music, where he was Principal Trumpet and featured soloist with the famed Eastman Wind Ensemble.  He began his career as an orchestral trumpeter at age 19 as third trumpet and assistant principal of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of David Zinman.  After three years with the Rochester Philharmonic, he joined the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Sir Georg Solti as the youngest member of the orchestra’s world-famous brass section.
 George Vosburgh holds the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Martha Brooks Robinson Chair and is an active member of various Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Committees.

 

Neal Berntsen
Trumpet

BERNTSEN_NEALNeal Berntsen joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra trumpet section in March 1997, having been appointed at the invitation of Music Director Lorin Maazel in 1996. He is a native of Tacoma, Washington. He began his musical studies at age five playing the violin under the tutelage of his mother. By age eight he advanced to the trumpet and ultimately received a B.M. from the University of Puget Sound and a M.M from Northwestern University. A former member of the Chicago Lyric Opera Orchestra and the Grant Park Symphony Orchestra, Neal has also performed as principal trumpet for the Ravinia Festival Orchestra and the Bamberg Sinfoniker in Germany. Other orchestral performances have included the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Active as a chamber musician, Neal is a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass whose recently released recordings, “Bach: The Art of Fugue” and “A Christmas Concert” were described as “…Awhirl with color and rhythmic vitality – quite irresistible on every count” by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Mr. Berntsen is also a founding member of the award-winning Asbury Brass Quintet, about which Fanfare magazine stated, “Not only expert but musical…undeniable virtuosity.” In June 2005 Mr. Berntsen toured Japan with members of the Chicago Symphony brass section with the Chicago Brass Soloists. As a soloist he recently performed the Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Other solo engagements have included the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 at the Sedona Chamber Music Festival in Arizona. Mr. Berntsen’s performance of Copland’s “Quiet City” was called a highlight of the 2005 season by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Mr. Berntsen’s solo recording Trumpet Voices will be released in November 2005.

Neal Berntsen was a finalist in both the Maurice André International Trumpet Competition in Paris, France and the Ellsworth Smith International Trumpet Competition. His wide ranging discography includes the Orchestras of Pittsburgh and Chicago, Manheim Steamroller, the American Girl Doll Christmas album and Michael Jackson.

As an educator, Mr. Berntsen is on the faculties of Duquesne University and Carnegie Mellon University. He previously served on the faculty of Valparaiso University in Indiana. He has been publiched in The Instrumentalist magazine, and the International Trumpet Guild Journal. Mr. Berntsen has presented master classes and recitals around the world.

Mr. Berntsen is an active studio musician and was featured on a national series of commercials during the broadcast of the Olympic games in Atlanta. His performance on “America” sung by Diana Ross opened the women’s final tennis match of the 2001 U.S. Open in Flushing Meadows, New York.

Neal Berntsen has studied with Adolph Herseth, Vincent Cichowicz and Manuel Laureano. He resides in Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania with his wife, Karen, and three children, Molly, Jacob, and Charlie.

William Caballero
Principal Horn

CABALLERO__WILLIAMDuring the Pittburgh Symphony Orchestra’s 2011 European Festivals Tour, William Caballero – and the horn section he leads – received rave reviews. Michael Church of The Independent called Caballero “a principal horn whose pianissimo is simply miraculous,” and Guy Dammann wrote in The Guardian, “The horn section – led very much from the front by their excellent principal William Caballero – is one of the best in the business.” In its September 2012 review of the Pittsburgh Symphony’s Exton recording of Mahler’s Symphony No. 5, Gramophone magazine wrote, “Pittsburgh’s first horn is as spectacular as any on disc.”

The 2013-2014 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra season represents Caballero’s 24th year as its principal horn. Before joining the Pittsburgh Symphony in May 1989, Caballero previously held principal horn positions with the Houston Symphony, Houston Grand Opera and Hartford Symphony. He held third horn positions with the Montreal Symphony, Montreal Opera and acting third horn with the Boston Symphony and Boston Pops. He has also performed as guest principal horn with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the St. Louis Symphony.

Born in New Mexico and reared in Wisconsin, Caballero’s early horn studies included working under Larry Simons, Barry Benjamin and Basil Tyler, as well as studying the piano and pipe organ. Caballero graduated from New England Conservatory in Boston where he studied with Richard Mackey and Thomas Newell, both former members of the Boston Symphony.

Currently, Caballero is the associate teaching professor of horn at Carnegie Mellon University School of Music. Previously, he held teaching positions at Indiana University Bloomington, Rice University in Houston, Texas and Duquesne University. He has been invited and presented master classes throughout the world including Northwestern University, Colburn School of Music, New England Conservatory, University of Indiana Bloomington, Cleveland Institute of Music, Curtis Institute of Music, Manhattan School of Music, New World Symphony and the Beijing and Shanghai Conservatories.

The past two summers Bill joined the faculty of the Aspen Music Festival as performer and teacher. For the previous seven summers, Caballero was on the faculty and performed at the Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo, Japan.

In January 2012, Caballero began collaboration with the Internet music teaching company ArtistWorks.com based in Napa, California. His teaching website was released in September 2012 as the only complete horn teaching curriculum available via the internet for horn students worldwide.

Caballero is also in demand as a chamber musician collaborating with musicians such as violinists Gil Shaham, Joseph Silverstein and Philip Setzer, and pianists André Previn, Christoph Eshenbach, Orli Shaham and Andre Watts. Caballero also has performed and worked with jazz musician and composer Chris Brubeck, as well as ensembles that include the Tokyo String Quartet, Trio Johannas, Principal Strings of the Berlin Philharmonic, Center City Brass, Bay Chamber Concert Series, St. Barth’s Music Festival and the Grand Teton Music Festival. He also is a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass, which includes fellow colleagues of the Pittsburgh Symphony brass section.

Recent chamber music performances include performing Brahms’ Horn Trio in E-flat major with Gil and Orli Shaham in Zankel Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, New York and appearing several times live on National Public Radio’s “Performance Today” in NPR’s Washington, D.C. studios.

This season is Caballero’s second appearance as soloist with Maestro Manfred Honeck. His first solo collaboration with Honeck was in September 2012 performing the Pittsburgh Symphony premiere of Strauss’ Horn Concerto No. 1. Previous solo performances with the Pittsburgh Symphony have included Richard Strauss’ Horn Concerto No. 2 in E-flatwith Maestro Lorin Maazel; Mozart’s Horn Concerto No. 2 in E-flatwith Maestro Andre Previn; Mozart Concerto fragments with Pittsburgh Symphony Concertmaster Andres Cardenes; Britten’s Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings with Maestro Stanislaw Skrowaczewski and tenor Anthony Griffey; Schumann’s Konzertstück in F, for four horns and orchestra with his Pittsburgh Symphony horn colleagues under the baton of Maestro Sir John Elliot Gardener; and the John Williams Horn Concerto under the baton of Maestro Leonard Slatkin.

Other recent solo appearances outside of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra have included performances in Montenegro with Maestro Ronald Zollman and with the Carnegie Mellon Philharmonic at New York City’s Carnegie Hall under the baton of former principal horn of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Dale Clevenger.

In May 1992, Caballero premiered Benjamin Lees’ Concerto for Horn and Orchestrawith the Pittsburgh Symphony under the baton of then-Music Director Lorin Maazel. Following the performances in Pittsburgh, he performed Lees’ Concerto in Spain, Germany and England with the Pittsburgh Symphony on tour. In May 1996, Caballero recorded the concerto with the Pittsburgh Symphony and Lorin Maazel for New World Records.

William holds the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s Anonymous Foundation Principal Horn Chair.

 

Peter Sullivan
Principal Trombone
Tom and Jamee Todd Chair

SULLIVAN__PETERIn the fall of 1999, Peter Sullivan was appointed Principal Trombone of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra by Mariss Jansons. Canadian-born Sullivan came to Pittsburgh following a long and fruitful tenure as Solo Trombone with the Montreal Symphony under Charles Dutoit.

Sullivan has performed as a soloist on many occasions with several orchestras including the Pittsburgh and Montreal Symphonys. In 2006, he performed the world premiere performance of Jennifer Higdon’s Trombone Concerto with Sir Andrew Davis and the PSO.

Apart from his activities in Pittsburgh, Sullivan performs regularly across North America, Europe and Asia as soloist and chamber musician alongside the world’s leading brass players.  He is a regular visitor to Japan, playing and teaching at the Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo, the Suntory recital hall in Tokyo, the Hamamatsu Summer Academy, as well as performing solo recitals in Osaka. In China, Peter is involved with the Canton International Summer Music Academy and performed and gave master classes at the Tian Jin and Beijing Conservatories in April of 2006.

Aside from countless orchestral performances in the great concert halls of Europe, Sullivan has performed at the Ascoli Piceno Brass Festival in Italy, and was featured in Christian Lindberg’s Trombone Concerto in Bunol, Spain with the composer on the podium. Sullivan was also the first prize winner in the 1990 Umea International Solo Competition in Sweden.

Here at home, Peter Sullivan has given concerts and clinics from coast to coast, including master classes at the Juilliard and Manhattan schools in New York City, The Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, the Glenn Gould Academy in Toronto, coaching at the New World Symphony and the Banff School and tours with the Summit Brass and the Music of the Baroque in Chicago. He has been heard across Canada in recital on CBC radio and on NPR with his colleagues in the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass.

Presently, Sullivan serves on the faculties of Duquesne and Carnegie Mellon universities in Pittsburgh, following 15 years as adjunct professor at McGill University in Montreal. For the past few years, he has been working with the Yamaha Corporation on the development of their new line of orchestral trombones, the prototype of which he plays every week with the PSO.

Craig Knox
Principal Tuba

KNOX__CRAIGCraig Knox joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra as principal tuba in 2005. His previous orchestra positions included acting principal tuba of the San Francisco Symphony as well as principal tuba of the Sacramento Symphony and the New World Symphony (Miami). Prior to his appointment in Pittsburgh, he was in demand as regular guest artist with many other major American orchestras, including those of Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit and Minnesota. Since 1995, he has spent part of each summer as co-principal tuba of the Grand Teton Music Festival in Jackson, Wyo.

Since joining the Pittsburgh Symphony, Knox also performs with the Pittsburgh Symphony Brass. He has been an active chamber musician for many years, having co-founded the Center City Brass Quintet, which has performed in recital throughout the United States and Japan, and been heard numerous times on NPR. Its five recordings on the Chandos label have met with critical acclaim, the first being described by American Record Guide as “one of the all-time great brass quintet recordings.” In addition, he played for several seasons with the Chicago Chamber Musicians Brass Quintet — with which he recorded for the Naxos label — and has toured with the Empire Brass.
In January 2012, Knox released his first solo recording, A Road Less Traveled, of music for tuba and piano. As a soloist, he has performed with the U.S. Army Band (Pershing’s Own) in Washington D.C., the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, the New World Symphony and the Carnegie Mellon University Wind Ensemble, in addition to recital performances at universities and music festivals around the world. In March 2012, he performed the world-premiere performances of Andre Previn’s Triple Concerto for Trumpet, Horn and Tuba with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and the composer on the podium.

In 2008, the Albany label released a CD recording featuring Knox and his colleagues in the Pittsburgh Symphony low-brass section. Featuring chamber music, orchestral collections and original compositions for three trombones and tuba, the album — titled From the Back Row — was called “hauntingly beautiful” and “hair-raising” by the American Record Guide.

Knox is artist lecturer of Tuba at Carnegie Mellon University, adjunct professor of tuba at Duquesne University and faculty at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. He previously served on the faculty at Kent State University and California State University-Hayward, as well as the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he was director of the Brass Chamber Music program. He has presented master classes, seminars and recitals at universities, conservatories and festivals around the world, including the Music Masters Course in Kazusa (Japan), the International Brass Symposium (Italy), Tainan National University (Taiwan), the Bruckner University of Music (Linz, Austria), Stuttgart Conservatory (Germany), the National Orchestral Institute (University of Maryland), the National Youth Orchestra of the U.S.A. (Carnegie Hall) and the New World Symphony, as well as the University of Michigan, Indiana University, Yale University and the Curtis Institute of Music, among many others.

A native of Storrs, Conn., Knox began formal musical studies on the classical guitar at age six, and took up the baritone horn in the fifth grade. At age 11, while attending a summer music camp, he was so enamored of the student orchestra that he switched to tuba so he could pursue a life in music as an orchestral performer. His first teachers included Gary Ofenloch, Samuel Pilafian and Chester Schmitz, and he attended the Curtis Institute of Music, where he studied with Paul Krzywicki of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and earned a Bachelor of Music degree.

Please visit craigknoxtuba.com for more information about Knox and his activities.

 

Andrés Cárdenes – Virtuoso Violinist

Andrés CárdenesViolin
Luz ManriquezPiano
Mark your calendars!  Hold the date… and JOIN US for what will be a unforgettable, autumn afternoon of consummate artistry as Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts proudly presents internationally acclaimed and Grammy-nominated virtuoso violinist, Andrés Cárdenes, and pianist Luz Manriquez in concert on Sunday, October 15 at 2:00 PM in Lincoln Hall, Foxburg.

Recognized worldwide as a musical phenomenon, Andrés Cárdenes has parlayed his myriad talents into one of classical music’s most versatile careers. As a violinist, Andrés has been hailed for “the kind of mastery, virtuosity and musical persuasion that should be placed in the company of the great violinists of the 20th century.” El Diario, Santiago, Chile  An intensely passionate and personally charismatic artist, Cuban-born Cárdenes has garnered international acclaim  from critics and audiences alike for his compelling performances as a violinist, conductor, violist, chamber musician, concertmaster, and recording artist.  In Helsinki, Finland, Cárdenes nearly blew the ceiling off Finlandia Hall with his fiery interpretation of the Sibelius Concerto. The hall was shaken by the shouting and stamping of feet.” Suomen Silta Magazine

Many in western Pennsylvania will remember Andrés Cárdenes’ twenty-one years as Concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, soloing in the orchestra in works such as Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben and appearing frequently in concerto performances. Andrés also conducted the Pittsburgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra for eleven seasons and served as a guest conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony for five seasons, before leaving to pursue his solo, chamber music and conducting career internationally.  As an acclaimed chamber music player, Andrés Cárdenes has performed with artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Pinchas Zukerman, Christof Eschenbach, Jon Kimura Parker, Andre Previn, Jaime Laredo, Elliot Fisk, Leonard Slatkin, and Joseph Silverstein.  He has been the violinist of the Diaz Trio since 1995 and has been a member of the Carnegie Mellon Piano Trio since 1991.

You do not want to miss this extraordinary afternoon of memorable performances of master works by Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms, Sergei Prokofiev and Cesar Franck… PLUS audience pleasing short works by Fritz Kreisler, arranged by violin greats Jascha Heifetz, Nathan Milstein and Paul Kochansky, featured on his CD, “It’s Quiet Here:  Little Gems for the Violin” on the Arabesque label.   Andrés Cárdenes is one of the most celebrated and accomplished classical artists to perform for ARCA’s appreciative audience in Lincoln Hall.

Tickets are Adults $30, ARCA Members $25, and Students $5.  After the concert, the audience is invited to a Meet the Artist reception at the Red Brick Gallery on Main Street in Foxburg for the opening of the exhibit of Pittsburgh-based pastel landscape artist, Diane Grguras.

Virtuoso Violinist – Andrés Cárdenes
With Pianist, Luz Manriquez


Johannes Brahms
                           Scherzo in C minor from F-A-E Sonata

Ludwig van Beethoven                 Sonata #5 in F major, Op 24

Sergei Prokofiev                              Five Mélodies, Opus 35

—Intermission—

César Franck                                      Sonata in A Major

Fritz Kreisler                                     Arrangements by Heifetz, Milstein, Kochanski

Andrés Cárdenes

Recognized worldwide as a musical phenomenon, Grammy-nominated Andrés Cárdenes parlays his myriad talents into one of classical music’s most versatile careers. An intensely passionate and personally charismatic artist, Cuban-born Cárdenes has garnered international acclaim from critics and audiences alike for his compelling performances as a violinist, conductor, violist, chamber musician, concertmaster, and recording artist.

Since capturing Second Prize in the 1982 Tchaikovsky International Violin Competition in Moscow, Mr. Cárdenes has appeared as a soloist on four continents with over 100 orchestras including The Philadelphia Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, St. Louis Symphony, Moscow Philharmonic, Dallas Symphony, Helsinki Philharmonic, Shanghai Symphony, Sinfonica Nacional de Caracas, Sinfonica de Barcelona, and the Bavarian Radio Orchestra.  He has collaborated with many of the world’s greatest conductors, including Lorin Maazel, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Mariss Jansons, Charles Dutoit, Christoph Eschenbach, Sir André Previn, Leonard Slatkin, Jaap van Zweden, David Zinman and Manfred Honeck.

This year and next Mr. Cárdenes continues his project to record many standard and contemporary concerti.  Released in 2009 are recordings of concerti by Brahms, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Barber and David Stock on the Artek and Albany labels. A recording of the complete works for violin by Leonardo Balada was released on Naxos in January 2011. The complete Sonatas by both Hindemith and Brahms, along with the Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Sibelius Violin Concertos and the complete Schubert Sonatinas and Fantasie are to be released on Artek in the summer and fall of 2016. Plans to record the complete Beethoven violin and piano sonatas with Ian Hobson are slated for 2015/16. Cárdenes’s discography includes over two dozen recordings of concerti, sonatas, short works, orchestral and chamber music on the Ocean, Naxos, Albany, Sony, Arabesque, RCA, ProArte, Telarc, Artek, Melodya and Enharmonic labels.

As an ambassador for music of our time, Mr. Cárdenes has commissioned and premiered over 70 works by American, Turkish and Latin American composers such as David Stock, Mike Garson, Erberk Eriylmaz, Leonardo Balada, Ricardo Lorenz, Eduardo Alonso-Crespo, Roberto Sierra, and Marilyn Taft Thomas. His concerto repertoire includes over 100 works, ranging from the Baroque era to the present.

Mr. Cárdenes has thrice served as President of the Jury of the Stradivarius International Violin Competition and in 2011 joined the jury of the Tchaikovsky International Violin Competition in St. Petersburg, Russia.

A Cultural Ambassador for UNICEF from 1980-1991 and an indefatigable spokesperson for the arts, Mr. Cárdenes has received numerous awards for his teaching, performances, recordings and humanitarian efforts, most notably from the Mexican Red Cross and the cities of Los Angeles and Shanghai.  He was named Pittsburgh Magazine’s 1997 Classical Artist of the Year and received the 2001 “Shalom” Award from Kollell’s International Jewish Center and the 2013 Chesed-Kindness Award from the Chabad Foundation for promoting world harmony and peace through music.

Mr. Cárdenes was appointed Concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra by Maestro Lorin Maazel in 1989 and departed after the 2010 season to concentrate on his conducting, solo and chamber music careers.

As an acclaimed chamber music player, Andrés Cárdenes has performed with artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Pinchas Zukerman, Christof Eschenbach, Jon Kimura Parker, Andre Previn, Jaime Laredo, Elliot Fisk, Leonard Slatkin, and Joseph Silverstein. Ensembles include Lincoln Center Chamber Players, Miami String Quartet, Gryphon Trio, Miro Quartet, Fry Street Quartet, Amernet Quartet, Ying Quartet, Shanghai Quartet, and the Cuarteto Latinoamericano.  He has been the violinist of the Diaz Trio since 1995 and has been a member of the Carnegie Mellon Piano Trio since 1991.

Among his many distinctions are a Grammy nomination in 1991 for his recording of the Tchaikovsky and Arensky Piano Trios with Mona Golabek and Jeffrey Solow.

From 2008-14, Cárdenes was Music Director of Strings Music Festival in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where Cárdenes also served as conductor of the Strings Festival Orchestra.

A consummate musician, powerful presence and master programmer, Andrés Cárdenes has established himself as a conductor possessing all the essentials of a modern maestro.  His innovative programming and compelling performances have earned him high praise from audiences, critics and colleagues alike.  Former Music Director of Strings Festival Orchestra (CO) from 2009-14, the Pittsburgh Festival Orchestra, and former Music Director and Leader of the Pittsburgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra from 1999-2010, Cárdenes has drawn audiences to the concert hall for a vast array of aural experiences.  A champion of living composers and the music of our time, Cárdenes’s formula for presenting diverse genres of music has been met with great enthusiasm.

Mr. Cárdenes began formal conducting studies at age 15 with Thor Johnson, former Music Director of Cincinnati Symphony.  Entering Indiana University to study with the legendary Josef Gingold, Cárdenes continued his education under the tutelage of Bryan Balkwill, former conductor at Covent Garden.  After winning top prizes at numerous international violin competitions, Cárdenes accepted concertmaster positions with the San Diego, Utah and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestras, remaining in those capacities for 25 years and apprenticing under the great maestros of today. Counted among his mentors are Lorin Maazel, Charles Dutoit, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos, Leonard Slatkin, Sir Andrew Davis and David Zinman.

In 1999, the Pittsburgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra was created for Andrés Cárdenes to highlight his multiple talents as conductor, violinist, violist and leader. The Chamber Orchestra enjoyed a remarkable eleven seasons, premiering 15 works and presenting dozens of rarely heard pieces by well-known composers.

In 2006, the Pittsburgh Symphony signed Mr. Cárdenes to a five-year contract to conduct the orchestra in subscription concerts each year.  His programming featured works by Poulenc, Hindemith and Debussy that were either Pittsburgh premieres or had not been performed in over 50 years.  Stepping in suddenly for an ailing Robert Spano, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review headlined “Cárdenes conducts with epic mastery”.

In addition to his frequent appearances with the Pittsburgh Symphony, Mr. Cárdenes has conducted orchestras across the globe: Munich Radio Orchestra, Dallas Symphony, Detroit Symphony, Sacramento Philharmonic, Colorado Symphony, St. Petersburg (Russia) Chamber Orchestra, San Diego Symphony, Fundacíon Beethoven Philharmonic (Santiago, Chile), OFUNAM Orchestra of Mexico City, Sinfonica de Venezuela, National Repertory Orchestra, River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, Sinfonia da Camera, Cleveland Institute Philharmonic and the Neue Philharmonie Westfalen in Germany.  He has collaborated with soloists such as Midori, Sarah Chang, Pinchas Zukerman, Elmar Oliveira, Gary Hoffman, Jon Kimura Parker, Ian Hobson, Gabriela Montero, Christopher O’Riley, David Deveau, Chee-Yun, Michelle deYoung and Lars Vogt.

Maestro Cárdenes is currently Music Director of Orchestral Studies and Conductor of the Carnegie Mellon University Philharmonic.

Luz Manriquez

Luz Manríquez was born in Santiago de Chile, where she studied with Elena Weiss at the Escuela Moderna de Música. Upon graduation, she continued to advance her studies under Edith Fisher in Switzerland and María Iris Radrigán at the Catholic University in Chile. Following the completion of her Master’s Degree at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Ms. Manríquez was appointed to the faculty as Artist Lecturer in Piano and Chamber Music in 1992. She was promoted to Associate Teaching Professor in 2004. Since 2012, she has also served as the Co-Director of Collaborative Piano.

Ms. Manríquez has been a regular guest of the Shadyside Concert Series and the Frick Art Museum Series. She has performed with the Nuance Music Ensemble, conducted by former PSO Concert Master, Andrés Cárdenes, as well as with the Chamber Music Project Ensemble at the Andy Warhol Museum. Since its founding in 2004 by cellist Aron Zelkowicz, Ms. Manriquez is also a regular guest with PJMF (Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival). She also appears yearly at the Carnegie Mellon Faculty Chamber Music Series.

Ms. Manríquez was the pianist in It’s Peaceful Here on Arabesque Records and Made in U.S.A. on Ocean Records, featuring violinist Andrés Cárdenes. She has also collaborated in recordings of works by contemporary composers such as Reza Vali, Marilyn Taft Thomas, Efrain Amaya, Nancy Galbraith and David Stock. Ms. Manríquez can be heard in recordings of oboe and piano music with PSO principal oboist Cynthia D’Almeida. She also has performed alongside flutist Alberto Almarza in Atacama (Nancy Galbraith). In 2015 and 2016 recordings with cellist Aaron Zelkowicz were released – Chamber Music of Joachim Stutchewsky and Leo Zeitlin’s Yiddish Songs and Chamber Music and Declamations, both on Toccata Classics.

In October 2002, Ms. Manríquez participated in the George Crumb Festival in Pittsburgh and recorded Music for a Summer Evening for two pianos and percussions conducted by Maestro Juan Pablo Izquierdo. This recording was released in 2006 and was awarded the Diapason d’Or Prize in 2008 in France.

As a pedagogue, Ms. Manríquez teaches at the Carnegie Mellon Preparatory School of Music, where she serves as acting Director of the Piano Division. Her students are prize winners in National and International piano competitions and have been invited to perform at highly-acclaimed venues such as Carnegie Music Hall (New York City) and in the United Nations. In May 2016, Ms. Manríquez was invited to give Master Classes at Yonsei University and Korea National University of Arts in Seoul, Korea. In May 2017, she inaugurated the first CMU Collaborative Piano Festival in Bogotá, Colombia.

One of Chile’s most distinguished musicians, Ms. Manríquez has appeared as soloist, recitalist and in chamber ensembles throughout the United States, Latin America and Europe. Her artistry, combined with an innate musical sensitivity to others, has made her a sought after chamber musician and collaborative artist. She has been a featured soloist with Cuarteto Latinoamericano, Renaissance City Winds and performs frequently with members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. In April 2003, Ms. Manriquez was invited to perform with The Chamber Music Project at the prestigious Bösendorfer Hall in Vienna, Austria for their Bicentennial anniversary Gala Concert.

 

Debussy & Schubert on the Allegheny

David Allen WehrPianist
Lorna McGheeFlute
Jennifer SteeleFlute
Marylene Gingras-RoyViola
Gretchen Van HoesenHarp
Jeffrey TurnerBass
Katherine SorokaMezzo Soprano

Join us for an Early Autumn Afternoon of  “Debussy and Schubert on the Allegheny” on Sunday, October 1 at 2:00 PM as Allegheny RiverStone Center for the Arts proudly opens its 2017 Fall Season with a chamber music program of gorgeous melodies and lush, impressionistic tone paintings in Foxburg’s Lincoln Hall.

Program host and pianist David Allen Wehr will be joined by members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra:  Principal Flute Lorna McGhee, Violist Marylène Gingras-Roy, Flutist Jennifer Steele, Principal Bass Jeffrey Turner, and Principal Harp Gretchen Van Hoesen plus Mezzo-Soprano Katherine Soroka.

This extraordinary program of beloved masterworks, part of the three-year, sold-out “Schubert on the Bluff” series at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, marks the return of David Allen Wehr and colleagues.  In year one of the series, they performed the beloved Schubert “Trout Quintet” in Foxburg for ARCA’s enthusiastic audience.  Each season the series has included a guest composer, with Claude Debussy doing the honors this year.

Artistic Director David Allen Wehr, along with five members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will perform Schubert’s Arpeggione Sonata (played by PSO Principal Bass Jeffrey Turner) and Debussy’s Suite Bergamasque (which includes Clair de lune, possibly the most popular classical piano piece ever written), alongside the more rarely heard Debussy Trio Sonata (with an ensemble led by PSO Principal Harp Gretchen Van Hoesen) and Schubert’s brilliant and virtuosic Flute Variations on “Trockne Blumen” from “Die Schöne Müllerin”, showcasing PSO Principal Flute Lorna McGhee.  Katherine Soroka will sing the Schubert song prior to its performance.

A favorite of Foxburg audiences, international competition winner, pianist David Allen Wehr will serve as the program host for the concert providing enlightening insights on the music and composers sure to delight and charm the audience.

Tickets are Adults $25, ARCA Members $20 and Students $5.  Call to reserve 724-659-3153 or buy online here.  Immediately following the concert, the audience is invited to meet the artists at a post concert reception in the Red Brick Gallery and Gift Shop coinciding with the exhibit of artists Julia McCray and Nancy Yergin.

Plan to make a full autumn day of it in FOXBURG on the beautiful banks of the Allegheny River – arriving early to walk or bicycle along the Allegheny or have lunch in The Allegheny Grille or Foxburg Pizza, wine tasting at Foxburg Wine Cellars, and gourmet coffee, ice cream and a handmade chocolate dessert at Divani Chocolatier and Barrista.

Photograph compliments of denniskeyesphotography.com


This program is part of Duquesne University three-year concert series, Schubert on the Bluff,  featuring works of Franz Schubert, the great Viennese composer of some of the most purely beautiful music ever written. Initially famous in his brief lifetime for his over 600 songs, Schubert made enormously valuable contributions to the chamber music literature, masterpieces full of passionate melodies and rich harmonies.

During the first season of Schubert on the Bluff, David Allen Wehr and PSO and Duquesne University colleagues performed the much beloved “Trout Quintet” in Lincoln Hall in Foxburg.  Returning in the third and final season of Schubert on the Bluff, this year’s concert will feature guest composer Claude Debussy. Schubert’s gorgeous melodies and emotionally gripping music has captivated audiences for almost two centuries, while Debussy’s lush, Impressionistic tone paintings have placed him among the giants of the 20th century. For the 16th season, Artistic Director David Allen Wehr, holder of the Jack W. Geltz Distinguished Piano Chair at Duquesne University, will lead his faculty colleagues, members of the Pittsburgh Symphony, in programs of some of the most memorable and moving music ever written.

Program Host – David Allen Wehr

David Allen Wehr’s international career was launched when he won the Gold Medal at the 1987 Santander International Piano Competition in Spain. The resulting tours have taken him to over 30 countries in Europe, North and South America, and the Far East, including performances in the world musical capitals of New York, London, Paris, Vienna, Washington, Madrid and Buenos Aires

It was David’s thirteen seasons touring the United States and Canada for Community concerts as a soloist and in chamber music partnerships that honed his unique ability to make great works of music accessible to the public.  Known for his ability as a “Living Program Note”, David Allen Wehr has a warm personality that welcomes an audience member into the emotion of the music and makes imaginative and simple the intricacies of great works of master composers.  The audience will certainly be charmed by this wonderful program made more enjoyable by the rich program commentary by David Allen Wehr.

Schubert on the Bluff Concert – “The Trout” 2015

Debussy and Schubert on the Allegheny
As Duquesne University’s “Schubert on the Bluff” comes to Foxburg

Lorna McGhee, Principal Flute, PSO
*Gretchen Van Hoesen, Principal Harp, PSO
*Jeffrey Turner, Principal Double Bass, PSO
*Jennifer Anne Steele, flute, PSO
*Marylene Gingras-Roy, viola, PSO
*David Allen Wehr, piano

* Duquesne University faculty artists

 

Schubert: Sonata in A Minor for Arpeggione and Piano, D. 821
Jeffrey Turner, double bass
David Allen Wehr, piano

Debussy: Trio Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp (1915)
Jennifer Anne Steele, flute
Marylene Gingras-Roy, viola
Gretchen Van Hoesen, harp

—-  Intermission  —-

Debussy: Suite Bergamasque for Piano
David Allen Wehr, piano

Schubert:  “Trockne Blumen” from “Die Schöne Müllerin”
Katherine Soroka, mezzo soprano
David Allen Wehr, piano

Schubert: Variations on “Trockne Blumen,” D. 802
Lorna McGhee, flute
David Allen Wehr, piano

 

David Allen Wehr

David Allen WehrDavid Allen Wehr holds the Jack W. Geltz Distinguished Piano Chair at the Mary Pappert School of Music. His international career was launched when he won the Gold Medal at the 1987 Santander International Piano Competition in Spain. The resulting tours have taken him to over 30 countries in Europe, North and South America, and the Far East, including performances in the world musical capitals of New York, London, Paris, Vienna, Washington, Madrid and Buenos Aires. Over 1,000 concerts include 13 seasons of touring the United States and Canada for Community Concerts as soloist, pianist with the Sartory Trio, and duo-recital partner with violinist Linda Wang and cellist Zuill Bailey. Wehr has been soloist with the London Symphony, National Symphony, Chautauqua Symphony, Houston Symphony, New Zealand Symphony and all the major Spanish and Latin American orchestras.

Born in Princeton, New Jersey, Wehr grew up in Boise, Idaho, where his parents, graduates of Westminster Choir College, were ministers of music at the Methodist Cathedral of the Rockies. Piano lessons began on his fourth birthday with his mother and continued with his father. Later teachers were Peggy Erwin, Edward Zolas and Sequeira Costa. Wehr studied at the Cleveland Institute of Music, the Taos School of Music, the Dartington Summer Music School in England, and holds degrees from the University of Kansas. He coached extensively with Leon Fleisher, Jorge Bolet and Malcolm Frager. Early in his career, Wehr won the 1975 Kosciuszko Chopin Prize in New York City, the 1983 National Federation of Music Clubs Young Artist Award, and Second Prizes in the 1983 Naumburg International Piano Competition at New York’s Carnegie Hall, and the 1986 Kapell Competition at the Kennedy Center.

David Allen Wehr has amassed a large and critically acclaimed discography with Connoisseur Society, Inc., with programs by Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninoff, Mussorgsky, Schumann, Delius, Czerny, Gershwin, Brahms, Griffes, Wagner-Liszt, Dvoř-k and Joe Utterback. The complete Beethoven Sonata Cycle has been released in four double-CD albums. His CDs are available through the Mary Pappert School of Music by calling (412) 396-6082 and at amazon.com. Since 2007, Wehr has served each summer as Principal Keyboard at the Sunflower Music Festival in Topeka, Kansas and the Buzzards Bay Musicfest in Marion, Massachusetts.

Wehr was first associated with Duquesne from 1991-1994, when the Sartory Trio was chamber ensemble-in-residence, and his current tenure began in 2001, when he was named the first Hillman Distinguished Chair. His previous performance projects here include the complete Beethoven Sonata Cycle (2002-2004), Beethoven’s “Dynamic Duos”: the complete violin-piano sonatas with Charles Stegeman, the complete works for cello and piano with Anne Martindale Williams, and the Ninth Symphony in Liszt’s two-piano transcription with Helene Wickett (2004), “Brahms on the Bluff”, (Brahms’ complete instrumental chamber music, 2005-2008), “Musique on the Bluff” (French music, 2008-2010), “Bicentennials on the Bluff” (Chopin and Schumann, 2010), “Dvořák at Duquesne” (2011), and “Budapest on the Bluff” (2012) and “Beethoven on the Bluff” (2013-14) presenting the major piano chamber works of Beethoven.

Lorna McGhee

Scottish-born Lorna McGhee is principal flute with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and has performed as guest principal with Chicago Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, London Symphony, London Philharmonic, Academy of St-Martin-in-the-Fields and Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Before emigrating to North America in 1998, McGhee was co-principal flute of the BBC Symphony Orchestra in England. As a soloist, she has given concerto performances with the London Symphony Orchestra, Scottish Chamber Orchestra and BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in the UK; Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, Toronto Philharmonia and Victoria Symphony in Canada; and the Nashville Chamber Orchestra and  Oregon Bach Festival Orchestra in the United States. A career highlight was a performance of Penderecki’s flute concerto with the Oregon Bach Festival Orchestra under the baton of the composer in 2004.

As a chamber musician and recitalist, she has performed throughout Europe and North America in such venues as London’s Wigmore Hall, Barge Music in New York, the Louvre, Paris and the Schubertsaal of Vienna’s Konzerthaus. McGhee is often featured in chamber music festivals in Canada, the United States and Australia. Her performances have been broadcast on CBC Radio in Canada, BBC Radio, NPR (USA), Netherlands Radio and ABC (Australia). She has made chamber music recordings for EMI, Decca ASV, Naxos and Meridian. Along with Duo partner Heidi Krutzen, McGhee has released two CDs on Skylark Music: Taheke, 20th century Masterpieces for flute and harp and Canada, New Works for flute and harp. As a member of Trio Verlaine (with Heidi Krutzen, harp and David Harding, viola) McGhee has most recently recorded Fin de Siècle, a CD of music by Debussy and Ravel for Skylark Music. Both the Trio and Duo are committed to broadening the repertoire and have contributed six new commissions to date.

Having taught at the University of Michigan and the University of British Columbia, McGhee has given master classes at universities and conservatoires in the UK, United States and Canada, including the Julliard School, the Royal Academy of Music and the Banff International Centre for the Arts. She is now an honorary “Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music.”

Marylène Gingras-Roy

gingras_roy_maryleneA native of Québec City, Canada, Marylène Gingras-Roy joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra viola section in the 1997 season, and in 2004 was promoted to fourth chair. She studied at the Conservatoire de Musique de Québec with Douglas McNabney and François Paradis and graduated in 1993 with unanimous First Prizes in both in viola and chamber music. She was then the recipient of Canada and Québec Arts Councils’ Scholarship Grants, enabling her to attend the Harid Conservatory with Victoria Chiang and the renowned Curtis Institute of Music with Karen Tuttle and Joseph DePasquale, where she earned an Artist Diploma in 1997.

Marylène has participated in many festivals, including the Festival Dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy, the Solti Project at Carnegie Hall, the Jerusalem Music Festival, the Jeunesses Musicales World Orchestra, where she served as Principal violist, and since 2000 she is a member of the Sun Valley Summer Symphony in Idaho.

Marylène is heard regularly in chamber music concerts and maintains a full teaching schedule at Duquesne University, privately and is the viola coach for the Three Rivers Young People Orchestra. Marylène has also taught at summer music festivals such as: Domaine Forget, Québec, Interharmony Festival in Germany and Advanced Chamber Music Seminar in Pittsburgh.

Katherine Soroka

Katherine Erlandson Soroka

Mezzo soprano Katherine Soroka has become known for her passion for conveying the song text and connecting with audiences. Her singing with the Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival was acclaimed as “masterful” and “heroic”, with “heartfelt vocalism” (Post Gazette). Katherine’s 2016 premiere of David Stock’s Solomon Songs with the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble was hailed for “finding both lush lines and dramatic intensity… commanding the stage””. (TribLive)

A winner of Pittsburgh’s Concert Society Major Auditions, vocal chamber music performances have included a Frick Museum Music For Exhibitions concert with Chatham Baroque and a performance of David Stock’s Three Yiddish Songs with a string quartet of Pittsburgh Symphony musicians in a Chatham University memorial concert. An avid recitalist, recently she has sung an all Mahler recital with Nathan Carterette, a  concert on Chatham University’s Eden Hall campus, and recitals in Kresge Recital Hall, at Allegheny College, in Lincoln Hall in Foxburg,  and in NYC at Cami and Merkin concert halls.

A proponent of new music, Katherine has sung Betty Oliviero’s Juego de Siempre in New York City with Joel Sachs and the Continuum contemporary ensemble and with the Duquesne Contemporary Ensemble the world premiere of Rumi Sings of Love by David Stock and Judith Shatin’s Ahkmatova Songs. Other venues include Aspen Music Festival, The Kitchen, Greenwich House, The Juilliard School, Columbia University, and City University of New York performing Chinery Ung and Noel Zahler, among others.

Katherine has sung with the Pittsburgh Civic Orchestra, the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, and narrated and sung with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in “Tiny Tots” and School-time educational concerts.  In 2018 she will sing Mahler’s Songs of the Wayfarer with the Edgewood Symphony and Klythemnestra in Elektra at Chatham University.  In her early career in NYC, she performed the roles of Cherubino, Romeo, Dido and Cenerentola and in cabaret at Panache and Don’t Tell Mama. She has performed musical theatre in summer stock, at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, and in 2016 performed the Witch in Into the Woods with the Barrow Civic Theatre.  Katherine is on the voice faculty of Mercyhurst University and teaches privately in Pittsburgh and Foxburg.

Jennifer Steele

Described by critics as “thoroughly delightful, with remarkable tone in every register,” Jennifer Steele enjoys a dynamic career as both an orchestral musician for the Pittsburgh Symphony and as a chamber player for several ensembles including the acclaimed Pittsburgh Chamber Music Project at the Andy Warhol Museum. Previous to her appointment as Second Flute by former PSO Music Director Lorin Maazel, Ms. Steele performed for five seasons as Principal Flute with the Charleston Symphony in South Carolina. While working towards her bachelor’s degree at the Juilliard School, Ms. Steele was afforded the luxury of studying with world-renowned flutists Jeanne Baxtresser and Julius Baker. Ms. Steele has performed numerous recitals in both the United States and Asia and in 1987, was awarded first prize in the first annual Flute Talk magazine competition. In addition to her current position as Second Flute, Ms. Steele has made several appearances as soloist with the PSO.

Outside of performing, Ms. Steele continues to show her dedication to training the next generation of flutists through her past and present associations with Carnegie Mellon, Indiana (Bloomington), and Duquesne universities, as a volunteer for the Pittsburgh Symphony’s Early Childhood Pilot Project, as an adjudicator for the National Flute Association, and as a contributing author for Flute Talk magazine.

Jeffrey Turner

TURNER__JEFFREYJeffrey Turner is the Principal Bassist of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Director of Orchestral Studies at Duquesne University, where he serves as conductor of the Duquesne Symphony Orchestra. A native of South Carolina, he completed his Bachelor’s degree with James VanDemark at the Eastman School of Music, and Master’s in Conducting with Dr. Robert Page at Carnegie Mellon University.

Before joining the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in 1987, Mr. Turner was the Principal Bass of the New American Chamber Orchestra from 1984 to 1986, and played with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra for the 1986-87 season. He has served as Visiting Professor at the Eastman School of Music, Indiana University, and the University of Maryland, and as a faculty member of Carnegie Mellon University for over 20 years.

Mr. Turner has served in recent years as Artistic Director of the City Music Center Chamber Orchestra and as Music Director of the Pittsburgh Live Chamber Orchestra. He has served as resident artist for many annual festivals including the Pacific Music Festival, The National Orchestral Institute, the National Youth Orchestra (USA), the Korsholm Festival (Finland), Indiana University’s Summer Music Festival, and The Asian Youth Orchestra (Hong Kong). He is featured as recitalist, clinician, and competition judge at the conventions of The International Society of Bassists.

Gretchen Van Hoesen

Gretchen Van Hoesen has been Principal Harpist of the Pittsburgh Symphony since 1977. She presently holds the Virginia Campbell endowed Principal Harp Chair of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and has appeared as soloist with the orchestra on numerous occasions, both on the subscription series and on tour. Ms. Van Hoesen gave the New York premiere of the Alberto Ginastera Harp Concerto in 1976 and the Pittsburgh premiere in 1978. She has appeared as soloist with conductors André Previn, Lorin Maazel, James Conlon, Zdnek Macal, Sergiu Comissiona, and Pinchas Zukerman and has collaborated with flutists James Galway, Bernard Goldberg, Jean-Pierre Rampal and Emmanuel Pahud. Additional appearances with the Pittsburgh Symphony have included performances of the Handel Concerto in B flat, Danses Sacré et Profane by Debussy, Concierto Serenata by Joaquin Rodrigo, Rhapsody by Peggy Stuart Coolidge, Noels for Harp by Marcel Tournier and the Concerto for Harp by Rheinhold Gliere. Ms. Van Hoesen and her husband, PSO Co-Principal Oboe James Gorton, presented the Pittsburgh premiere of Witold Lutoslawski’s Double Concerto for Oboe, Harp and Chamber Orchestra on the Pittsburgh Symphony subscription series. She gave the United States premiere of Suite Concertante for solo harp and orchestra by Manuel Moreno-Buendia in San Antonio, Texas. In March 2008 she presented the world premiere of Sir André Previn’s Concerto for Harp on the Pittsburgh Symphony subscription series. Concert Piece, Op. 65 for Oboe/English horn, Two Harps, and Orchestra by Eugene Goossens will close the orchestra’s subscription season in June 2012.

Ms. Van Hoesen has also performed as soloist with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the National Orchestral Association, the Greenwich Philharmonia, the Sun Valley Summer Symphony, the Lake Placid Sinfonietta and the Westmoreland Symphony. She has concertized in the metropolitan New York area at Carnegie Recital Hall, Alice Tully Hall and the Brooklyn Museum, and has presented concertos at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. Ms.Van Hoesen was winner of the 1978 Passamaneck Competition. Gretchen Van Hoesen was selected to perform in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan, in the Super World Orchestra 2000, an orchestra made up of key musicians from around the globe. She has been a featured soloist at American Harp Society National Conferences in Boston, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Denton, Washington, D.C. and Fredonia. Ms.Van Hoesen has served as a judge for National Competitions of the American Harp Society and has been past President of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Harp Society.

Gretchen Van Hoesen graduated from the Juilliard School of Music earning both B.M. and M.M. degrees in harp as a scholarship student of Marcel Grandjany and Susann McDonald. She is also a graduate of the Eastman School of Music Preparatory Department with highest honors in piano and harp, where she was a student of Eileen Malone. She further studied with Gloria Agostini.

Her recordings include Lullabies and Night Songs on the Caedmon label, Pavanes, Pastorales, and Serenades for Oboe and Harp, and Concertos for Harp, CD’s on the Boston Records label, and Breath of Heaven, A Christmas Collection with Soprano Sarah Botkin and a work by Bernard Andres with Judith LeClair, Principal Bassoonist with the NY Philharmonic.

Ms. Van Hoesen is a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon and Duquesne universities and combines teaching there with private students at her home in Pittsburgh. She has given master classes at Duquesne University, the Eastman School of Music, The Curtis Institute of Music, Manhattan School of Music, the University of Illinois, the Aspen Music Festival, the National University of the Arts in Seoul, Korea, and has been an artist-lecturer on numerous series in Pittsburgh as well as throughout the country. She was a faculty member of the Aspen Music Festival and School from 2001-2006. She is a past president of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Harp Society. Her students have won numerous national awards and prizes.

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